My Green Nappy Discovering Modern Cloth Nappies and Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies

August 10, 2010

How Do I Wash My Cloth Nappies?

The Sponsors of the first Green Promise Nappies are your Nappy Doulas for this series of ‘Congo Questions’.

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

Winter Green Promise Nappy Sponsors – Congo Advice #10

“How do I wash my cloth nappies?”

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs. No-one sees what anyone else contributes until it is published here. This is what your Nappy Doula’s have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

Wash cloth nappies in warm water about 40 degrees. Don’t put too many nappies in one cycle and make sure the water level is set to high. Use 1/3 to 1/2 the usual amount of detergent and give them a rinse cycle at the end to make sure there isn’t any residue. For best results hang in the sun until they are completely dry.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

If they haven’t been rinsed before putting in the bucket, give them a rinse, wash them with a quarter of the amount of detergent than you would normally use, on cold or warm, whtaever you prefer. Try to use an eco friendly detergent, or something that is good for sensitive skin. (because other detergents may damage your nappies) Then hang them up to dry!

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

When changing nappies, I tip any solid waste in the toilet.
I do a pre-wash rinse to get rid of any solid waste left behind. Then wash with your normal laundry detergent (in cold water if the detergent is suitable), no fabric softener as it leaves a water- resistant coating on fabrics, and line dry.
I pull the inserts out of pocket nappies after the nappies are washed, when I’m hanging them out.
On a wet winter day, I hang nappies on a drying rack inside. If there’s not enough room or time, I tumble dry just the inserts and fitted nappies, and dry pocket outers and covers on a rack.
Line drying is worth the extra five minutes, as it fades light stains and helps give nappies a fresh scent. It also gives the kids an excuse for a little more fresh air, and they’re often happy to help.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

I dry pail then straight into the machine (I have a front loader) with 1/4 the amount of detergent required – try to get one without oil based products.

Kyra from E-Weez:

We recommend dry-pailing. Simply remove any solids into the toilet and put the dirty nappy into a bucket until you do a wash, make sure you don’t leave dirty nappies for more than two days.

You can wash your nappies on a normal cold, warm or hot wash, use a third of the recommended amount of detergent and don’t use any fabric softener, bleach, enzyme-based or ‘soap’ products. An extra rinse at the end of the wash will help ensure all the detergent is removed. Stains can be removed by hanging your nappies in the sun – sunshine is a natural bleacher and sanitiser!

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Washing Modern Nappies is easy. Simply dispose of any solid waste, give the nappy and booster a quick rinse, then dry pail your nappies (place them in a dry bucket) until you have enough to make up a load of washing. Put them into the washing machine, using about a quarter of the washing powder or detergent that you would use for a regular load and wash! Be sure not to use any fabric softeners of bleaches (including stain removers) as these can build up residue on your nappies, making them less absorbent and therefore less effective.

Kyra from Bubbalooba:

Washing is so easy – just throw in the washing machine with some half-strength washing detergent (you can buy many environmentally friendly washing “ingredients” such as soapnuts, soon to be available in our store) and hang on the line to dry.

The sun will get rid of any stains or odours! Try not to use fabric softener, vinegar, or Napisan, as these products can damage the nappy fabrics.

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

Gone are the days of using harsh chemicals and soaking for days with cloth nappies. If anyone tries to tell you different Pfft to them, times change! The process is really simple:

1. After use, remove any chunky bits and flush down the toilet.

2. Take stuffing out of the pockets and stick them both in a dry nappy bucket. Soaking of MCN is not advised nor necessary.

3. Cold/Warm wash the nappies with 1/4 to 1/2 the detergent you would normally use.

4. Dry out in the sun, with the lining facing towards the sun. The sun is great at removing any stains!

A few extra tips 🙂

  • Do not use bleach, vinegar or other soakers as with continued use it can cause the nappy materials to weaken, as can dryer use.
  • To keep your nappies in beautiful show off condition, before you wash, do up the side straps and then turn the lining to face outwards.

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

Washing your nappies shouldn’t be hard at all. If you have rinsed them, placed them into a dry bucket, then all you need to do at wash time is tip the bucket into the washing machine, add a little washing powder or soapnuts and press start!

I highly recommend using Flushable Bioliners to make cleaning poo nappies so much easier. All you need to do is place the whole flushable liner along with the poo into the toilet. It is a good idea to give your nappies a ‘double rinse’ occasionally too.

A simple explanation is on my blog here: How should I wash the nappies? Is it hard?

To wash, simply:

Drypail – clean/wash off solid matter first into the toilet before storing in a dry pail

Cold pre-rinse – dilutes urine

Machine wash between 40º-60ºC

Line dry (recommended) or use dryer on low setting

Pre-stuff pockets, match boosters to nappies and they’re ready to use again

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

I am sure you have gained new insights from their experience.

– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something new in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your cloth nappy washing routine:

What do you do? Do you have any extra tips or ideas to share?

August 3, 2010

What Wool ‘Soakers’ Can I Use Over My Baby’s Cloth Nappy?

The Sponsors of the first Green Promise Nappies are your Nappy Doulas for this series of ‘Congo Questions’.

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

Winter Green Promise Nappy Sponsors – Congo Advice #9

“I would like a simple explanation of the wool soakers to use over a baby’s cloth nappy. What do I buy?”

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs. No-one sees what anyone else contributes until it is published here. This is what your Nappy Doula’s have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

To be quite honest the only wool covers I have tried are the Baby Beehinds and I love them, unfortunately they seem to be discontinued. There are some great WAHM wool soakers if you go to OzeBaby or WAHMnaps.

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

I look for soakers that are machine washable, and fit well – Cushie Tushies are my favourite.

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

A woollen soaker is a knitted pair of pants, and can be long or short. An effective woollen soaker will be closely knitted with 100% pure wool. Wool is another material which wicks moisture away from bub without leaking. Wool soakers can be made more effective by lanolising (dissolving a blob of lanolin in hot water, letting the water cool then soaking the soaker in the mixture), which simply reinforces the natural water resistant nature of the wool. There are many WAHM’s who knit and sell wool soakers, including Ticklefish Tots from time to time.

Rebecca From Bean Sprout Bubba:

Wool covers can be either sewn from a wool fabric or handknit from wool yarn.

They can be either triangluar wraps or pullup covers.

Wool pullup covers are either soakers (covers the nappy snugly), shorties (like a pair of shorts) or longies (like a pair of long pants).

There are also capri-length wool pullup covers, and skirties that have little skirts attached to the pullups.

To use, you will need a cover or two (or more), some lanolin (lansinoh nipple cream or anhydrous wool fat from the chemist), and optionally some woolwash or baby shampoo. Also need a good set of wool care instructions and instructions on how to relanolise your woollies.

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

Here is a post which links to a great video showing you step-by step how to crochet a woolen soaker for your baby: How do I crochet a woolen nappy soaker?
P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…
– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something useful in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your search for the best baby shower gifts:

What would you like to receive as a baby shower gift?

July 27, 2010

Australian Made Cloth Nappies? – I Don’t Want ‘Made In China’!

The Sponsors of the first Green Promise Nappies are your Nappy Doulas for this series of ‘Congo Questions’.

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

Winter Green Promise Nappy Sponsors – Congo Advice #8

“On principle I try to buy products that are not made in China. I would love you to direct me to an Australian made cloth nappy that is not full of plastic.”

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs. No-one sees what anyone else contributes until it is published here. This is what your Nappy Doula’s have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

We stock Sweet Tooshies nappies that do have an inner layer of PUL for waterproofing, but there isn’t plastic anywhere near kiddies skin. Cloth nappies need an inner waterproof layer or a cover to keep clothes dry.
Genesa Forge stocks nappies with a polar fleece inner but they are a little bulkier. The bigger companies like Baby Beehinds, Itti Bitti, etc that get their products made in China do so ethically and are Australian owned companies all started by WAHMs too.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

There are some fantastic work at home mum brands out there – Bonnibuns, Genesa Forge, B Cheeks, Flattery, Green Bums, the list goes on!

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

There really aren’t many Australian made cloth nappies available to retailers anymore. The market price means that most cloth nappies are now made in China, India, and Pakistan.
But most of the modern cloth nappy brands in Australia are still owned and run by Australian work-at-home mums. Some are one-woman businesses, where manufacturing is the only thing that has been outsourced. Others have employed other work-at-home mums to handle order processing and marketing.
If your reason for avoiding made-in-China products is manufacturing ethics, you can be assured that every brand stocked at Brindabella Baby has been checked out to ensure their manufacturers provide workers with a fair living wage, and safe, clean working conditions.
Before we stock a product, we ask detailed questions about pay and working hours, and often have copies of inspection certificates or photographic evidence to back up their claims.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

Have a look for a wahm nappy but remember that the majority of the raw materials are probably made in china anyway. As long as the product is ethically made I think we as Australians need to get past the made in china issue. I always say if people are so concerned about products being made in China then how come so many people have iphones, TV’s etc.

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Ticklefish Tots nappies are proudly handmade in Australia by a WAHM of 4 (almost 5!) The waterproof layer that I use in my day time (AI2) nappies is polyurethene laminate (PUL) which is a breathable yet waterproof fabric. Most of my nappies have this layer hidden between the microfleece inner layer and the decorative outer layer of the nappy shell. In my night nappies, I use a durable water repellant 300 weight fleece (usually also hidden, with an extra layer throughout the wet zone), which wicks moisture away from baby’s bottom, where it then evaporates, rather than leaking outside of the nappy.

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

All Noonee Wilga products are custom made in Australia. If you have particular requirements, such as special sizing or fabrics, contact me to make up something just for you.

Fiona and Catherine from Darlings Downunder:

It’s getting harder to source cloth nappies that are made in Australia.

– Bubblebubs and Green Kids are two that spring to mind, but there are others. There are still plenty of WAHMs who make nappies to sell as well. But don’t reject the Chinese made nappies out of hand. Many of the Australian nappy business that have their nappies made overseas actively source organic and fairtrade raw materials and have their nappies manufactured in ethical conditions – thereby actively contributing to the development of third world countries. It’s an important consideration.

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

I’ve also tried to live by this principle and I love supporting fellow work from home parents in various fields with our hard earned dollars.

Krap Katchers is Australian Made with me as the little workhorse and I hope to expand my workforce to include other work from home parents in the near future as well.

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

For the New Zealanders (and Australians who don’t mind buying NZ made – still not China made!) we stock Ecobubs Wool Pocket nappies which have an excellent reputation for being a great nappy. They are a Wool Mix product, lined with microfleece, which will help keep baby warm in Winter and cool in Summer.

Rebecca From Bean Sprout Bubba:

There are a few around, and if resin snaps, velcro, PUL, polar fleece or microfibre is not considered ‘plastic’ then there would be many more options open to you.

Otherwise, there are quite a number of Australian makers who make fitted nappies out of bamboo or hemp, and covers that are either sewn out of wool fabric, or knit with wool yarn.

Bean Sprout Bubba has Bubba J bamboo or hemp fitteds, and wool covers, these are made to order once current stocks run out.

Michelle from Sustainable Hemp Products:

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something new in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your search for the best baby shower gift:

What would you like to receive as a baby shower gift?

July 20, 2010

Why Do Wet Nappies Smell So Bad Some Times? (What Can I Do About It?)

The Sponsors of the first Green Promise Nappies are your Nappy Doulas for this series of ‘Congo Questions’.

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

Winter Green Promise Nappy Sponsors – Congo Advice #7

“The Smellies! My husband is worried about the smells associated with piddly nappies. What are my options, and why do wet nappies smell so bad some times?”

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs. No-one sees what anyone else contributes until it is published here. This is what your Nappy Doula’s have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

If you quickly rinse your nappies before pailing them or wash them within 48 hours of wearing then they shouldn’t smell. Every month or two give them a wash in warm water without detergent and hang in the sun to dry. We have Rockin Green Nappy Detergent coming soon which is also great fo stinky nappies.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

Nappies can smell bad for a few reasons.
If babies are teething, their urine tends to be very ammonia smelling.
If cloth nappies are not quite dry when they are worn and the wee hits them, they can smell.
It’s a good idea to rinse nappies before throwing them in the bucket, so they aren’t sitting around in wee all day.
There is a fantastic new product on the market called rockin’ green, which will eliminate this problem for good! It’s an eco friendly washing powder, made especially for cloth nappies.

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

They don’t smell as bad as a rubbish bin full of disposable nappies with solid waste rolled up in them!
Washing every couple of days will help. When washing, use a detergent that won’t leave a residue to build up on the fabric, rinse well, and line dry. This washing method will help get all the smells out.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

Get a great nappy bucket and you won’t even notice – a wetbag is essential while travelling try an oilcloth one rather then PUL and you won’t notice the smells.

Kyra from E-Weez:

Smelly nappies are usually caused by concentrated urine, this is happens particularly with night nappies or when your baby is teething. Make sure you rinse these smelly nappies before dry-pailing them as the strong urine can cause the fibres to break down and will reduce the lifespan of your nappies.

To contain the smells, use a nappy bucket with a lid and sprinkle baking soda of a few drops of essential oil in the bottom of the bucket to keep it fresh. Your nappies shouldn’t be smelly after they’ve been washed and dried. If they do smell when they’re clean, try washing your nappies in hot water without detergent and use 1/2 cup white vinegar in the final rinse (no hotter than 60 degrees celsius and only use vinegar once every few months). If smelly nappies are a regular problem, try using Dettol Fresh or Canestan in the wash once a week to keep them smelling fresh.

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

To be honest, I have never had a problem with smelly cloth nappies. Back in the day when our parents may have used cloth terry squares and pilchers on us (or our siblings), alot of the smell then were associated with the fact that the plastic pilchers do not breathe, so everything was contained within them. These days, modern cloth nappies usually have a breathable waterproof layer, or a breathable cover which wicks moisture away from baby’s bottom. These factors, combined with the majority of natural fabrics most nappy makers use, help to eliminate the smells whilst your child is wearing Modern Nappies.

Whilst your nappies are dry-pailing, waiting for a full load, there are various ways to eliminate odours (which again, I haven’t found to be that common) …

  • a quick rinse prior to putting the soiled nappy in the bucket usually gets rid of most of the urine contained in the boosters
  • using a bucket with a lid will help contain any potential odours
  • there are products on the market especially designed for using whilst dry pailing MCN (but again, in almost 2 years, I have never found any reason to use them!)

Sometimes, you may find that leaving a wet nappy on for too long will cause it to smell (and it’s not good for your baby either!) but this can happen with disposables too!

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

Change nappies frequently and wash every day or two. If you rinse dirty nappies first, then you can add other items like towels and clothing to make up a full load, if you wish. If you find that night nappies are particularly pungent, then it may be wise to rinse them well by hand right after taking them off if you can’t immediately put them in the wash.

Kyra from Bubbalooba:

The smell sometimes builds up in the microfibre in the absorbent inserts – you can wash these separately with 1/4 cup vinegar (or you can wash the inserts together with the nappies, but don’t add vinegar too often as this will deteriorate the elastic and PUL). Hang to dry in the sun for as long as possible – the sun and fresh air is wonderful for removing odours!

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

If the nappies smell really bad (especially when bubs is teething) simply rinse the nappies off a little before placing in the nappy bucket. There are also nappy bucket products available to help mask those odours to make it more pleasant for everyone.

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

Sometimes at certain times (like when baby is teething) the amonia in their wees can smell strong. If you double rinse your nappies that will ensure that no amonia is left in the nappies which could make the nappies smell stronger when wee’d in.

The best advice really is to change baby’s nappy as soon as they have wee’d in it. Your nappy bucket shouldn’t smell if you’ve rinsed your nappies before placing them in and if you have your lid on.

Rebecca From Bean Sprout Bubba:

Smells are unavoidable and part of the nature of wee/poo: it never smells good at any age 🙂

Options while nappy is still on a child is to use a wool cover over fitted nappies overnight, as they can pong while still on the bottom especially overnight.

Keep the pail out of sunlight, the heat may intensify the smell.

When drypailing, if using a closed pail (with lid) you can try sprinkling bicarb in the bucket to reduce smells, or use a commercially produced nappy product like Pail Pals or a deodorising powder.

Otherwise use an open pail to reduce smells overall (there may be some residual smell, but not as bad as opening a closed pail!)

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something new in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your quest for the best smelling nappies around:

What tip would you like to share about keeping baby’s bottom fresh smelling?

July 13, 2010

Nappy Accessories that Make Modern Cloth Nappies Easy and Convenient

The Sponsors of the first Green Promise Nappies are your Nappy Doulas for this series of ‘Congo Questions’.

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

Winter Green Promise Nappy Sponsors – Congo Advice #6

“What accessories are most convenient to using MCN with ease?”

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs. No-one sees what anyone else contributes until it is published here. This is what your Nappy Doula’s have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

Nappy bucket, a plastic container to hold wipes and a good wetbag.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

Flushable Liners!

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

Cloth wipes! Why separate disposable wipes for the bin from cloth nappies for the bucket, when you can roll it all up together and throw it in the bucket?
Cloth wipes use nothing but clean water to clean up sticky messes on faces, hands, and bottoms – you’ll use them long after you’ve finished with nappies. And because there’s no chemicals involved, they’re less likely to irritate sensitive newborn skin.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

Flushable liners.

Kyra from E-Weez:

I say Bio-liners! These are fantastic as you can just pick up the liner and flush away the poo!

Eva from Oz Baby Trends:

Flushable liners are fabulous, particularly if you can predict when your child will do a poo, then you need only use 1 or 2 a day.

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Definitely a wetbag to store your used MCN while you are out and about, to keep the smells out of your nappy bag until you get home! Plus, you can never have too many cloth wipes on hand – not only are they good for a chemical free way to clean your baby’s bottom, you can also use them to clean sticky hands and dirty faces while you are out!

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

Make your own nappy liners: buy 1m of microfleece and cut it into rectangles approx 15cm x 40cm (or suitable size for your nappies). Microfleece does not fray so there is no need to sew the edges.

Fiona and Catherine from Darlings Downunder:

Dealing with poo is a reason often given for not trying cloth nappies.

It seems strange to me because babies are inherently messy creatures and you’ll end up with poo on your hands whatever sort of nappy you use! For those who shudder at the thought of removing poo from nappies or fleece liners (trust me, it’s not that hard!), flushable liners are for you. You just lift up the pooey liner and drop it in the toilet.

Easy.

The one imperative: somewhere secure (a bucket with a lid that seals or a laundry bag hung up high on a door) for your wet & dirty nappies.

Security is important – not because of the hazard of an open bucket of water (I don’t soak and don’t recommend it, either) – but to stop your toddler getting into the bucket and spreading the dirty nappies over the couch. This is the voice of experience…

Kyra from Bubbalooba:

Cloth wipes are excellent to use with Modern Nappies – just rinse and wash with the nappies! They are a lot cheaper than having to buy disposable wipes, and are sooo soft (made from flannelette).

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

Wetbags and wipes are a must! I’m often surprised when I hear of modern nappy users switching to disposables when out and about and I often wonder why, especially when out and about is the best time to show cloth bums off!

Simply take a wetbag along with you pop your dirty nappy, wipes or anything else like soiled clothing in too and all the smells are contained. Reusable wipes are fantastic as well, you’re already washing nappies – just add the wipes in as well and save yourself the expense of buying wipes every week.

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

I highly recommend using a Wetbag and Cloth Wipes with your Modern Cloth Nappies. Wetbags make cloth nappying easy when you’re out and about and perfect for your cloth nappied baby at daycare too! Cloth Wipes just make sense when you’re cloth nappying too because you can just wash them with your nappies with ease.

Rebecca From Bean Sprout Bubba:

There are a few optional accessories to make life easier with MCNs

– PUL wetbags and flushable nappy liners: great for using when out and about. Flushable nappy liners can easily take solid waste off a nappy with minimal fuss, and they can be flushed down the loo where they belong. Note: make sure they are Flushable and not just disposable.

– Nappy sprayers: great for rinsing solid waste into the loo, and for rinsing ‘toxic’ teething wee out of nappies, before drypailing. It is simply a showerhead attachment with a hose that attaches to your toilet cistern. Other uses: cleaning in and around the toilet, cleaninng the worst off a little bottom before wiping (sorry if TMI!) LOL…

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

The next congo question in this series will offer you an understanding of the ways modern nappies are made, and what you need to be aware of when making your choices…

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something useful in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your search for the best cloth nappy accessories:

What would you recommend as an essential cloth nappy accessory?

July 6, 2010

What’s the Best Cloth Nappy Gift for a Baby Shower?

The Sponsors of the first Green Promise Nappies are your Nappy Doulas for this series of ‘Congo Questions’.

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

Winter Green Promise Nappy Sponsors – Congo Advice #5

My friend is having a baby. What’s a lovely nappy ‘gift set’ I could offer for her baby shower?

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs. No-one sees what anyone else contributes until it is published here. This is what your Nappy Doula’s have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

I would give her a nappy of a couple of different brands, such as our nappy trial pack.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

Well, you have come to the right place! Ninky Bear has a brand new Unique Gift Range! Flower Pots and Lolly Jars, made from Modern Cloth nappies and baby clothes! A fantastic way to introduce new users to the wonderful world of modern cloth nappies!

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

Why not match a cute nappy (like Cushie Tushies Couture all-in-ones, or Bumwear print pockets) to organic cotton BabyLegs legwarmers?

Or choose a nappy and match it to a fair trade toy – like a finger puppet, small wooden toy, or soft toy.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

I buy my friends a GroVia day pack.

Eva from Oz Baby Trends:

The Pop-Ins are available in boxed trial packs ($38) which come with a nappy, mini wet bag and flushable liner. Or if you’re happy to spend a bit more, some of our retailers stock the Pop-In Day Pack ($169) which consists of 5 Pop-Ins and 1 dri-night booster.

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

There are a number of small businesses and work at home mums who now do “nappy cakes” (some even do cloth ones!) These often have all sorts of little things that one may need for a newborn, such as singlets, socks, facewashers, baby creams, bath washes and powders, baby wraps and of course nappies!

Ticklefish Tots has developed a “gift set” which is suitable, not only for newborns, but for any age baby! They consist of 4 complete AI2 nappies, 4 cloth wipes, and a wetbag, packaged in a teddy bear back pack! Of course, not everyone is a cloth nappy fan, so you’d need to know if this is the path your friend has chosen before bestowing cloth gifts upon her!

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

Cloth breast pads are so soft against the skin and very absorbent. At Noonee Wilga I make several styles of breast pads for both light and heavy absorbency.

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

Depending on your price range, the Itti Bitti nappies are just gorgeous if you want a pretty gift. We can put together a gift set to suit you including any of our range of Bandana Bibs, Cloth Wipes, Merino Hats, Changing Mats, Wetbags… Send an email through and we’ll put something together especially for you!

Rebecca From Bean Sprout Bubba:

If she is going to use cloth nappies, buy a set with a nappy, wetbag and extra inserts for her to start off with.

Ask her what brand she likes, and whether she wants a keepsake nappy (usually newborn or small size) or a practical nappy (usually small upwards).

Or find out about nappy cake makers, some of them are made up with terry towelling nappies, and some even have modern cloth nappies included in them.

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

P.S Have you seen the Modern Cloth Mini Trend of Nappy Cakes?

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something new in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

June 29, 2010

Starting Cloth Nappies with a Toddler…

Starting Cloth Nappies with a Toddler…

“I have a young toddler and want to make the switch to cloth nappies during the day to save money. Is that a good idea? What’s a good strategy – where do I start?”

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs.

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

This is what I did. I bought a couple of second hand itti bittis, bumGenius, Green Kids and Baby Beehinds to see what I liked before commiting to a huge outlay.
Being on forums such as Nappy addicts and Essential baby, Bub Hub and Belly Belly etc you start to learn about other nappies and trial a few. These also have places or can tell you where to buy and sell second hand nappies.
Don’t get disheartened if a couple of nappy types don’t work – not all nappies fit all bubs and toddlers.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

Yes it’s a brilliant idea! I only started using cloth when my second was about 10 months old! And I am kicking myself for thinking it was too hard, and not doing it sooner! I have saved a fortune. I found it was easier to buy one or two nappies a fortnight, or layby, so I wasn’t paying out a lot of money all at once. The savings in the long run are incredible. You should start by buying a few different brands, until you find one that works best for you/your child.

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

Great idea! Many toddlers will develop toilet awareness faster if you choose cloth nappies that don’t have a stay-dry liner, so they can learn from the feeling of wetness.

Go for a simple prefold-plus-covers nappy system for a cost-effective solution that encourages toilet awareness. Mandy Mac bamboo prefolds are absorbent and quick drying, and Bumwear covers have two layers of leg elastic to help stop leaks.

Or invest in Bumwear pull-up pants instead, so you get the absorbency of a nappy with the grown-up underpants when they’re ready to use a potty or toilet.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

Toddlers are a great time to start using cloth as you have a large variety to choose from plus it will make you see how easy it is and hopefully put you down the cloth road with future bubs.

Kyra from E-Weez:

It’s definitely a good idea! Depending on your toddler, I would opt for either an All-In-One system (good for a toddler who won’t sit still long for changes) or a fitted and cover system (more cost efficient and some kinds can be used on younger babies if you are planning to have more kiddies). If you are short on cash you could start off by only purchasing one or two MCN’s nappies and then perhaps try to purchase another MCN every paycheck, this way you’ll build your stash slowly without the large upfront costs and save on disposables at the same time.

Eva from Oz Baby Trends:

I would recommend toilet training. Invest in some waterproof undies or specific training pants and use them instead of nappies (cloth or disposable). Refuse to look back! Once you’ve started toilet training, don’t put a nappy back on your child except for nights, naps and going out. The best way to do this is to only buy 4-6 cloth nappies so you’ll have enough for nights/naps, but never enough to fall into full-time use.

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

This is exactly what I did! OK, I had a newborn as well, but my toddler was 2 years old, and spent the next 2 years in cloth! This amounted to a HUGE saving compared to having him in disposables for the same period of time! Ultimately, it depends on your child, and how close they are to toilet training. My youngest has been toilet trained at home since he was 18 months old, but is still in nappies whenever we leave the house, mostly for my own sanity, but also because he is still very unsure about public toilets.

If you do decide to cloth nappy your toddler during the day, work out how many nappies they go through each day and how often you’d be prepared to wash (in my situation, I wash nappies every 4-5 days!). There are quite a few stores and sites online that do Modern Cloth Nappy hire (Ticklefish Tots is one of those!) Some even hire out a variety of different brand nappies to you at once so that you can compare and see what you like and what suits you – and this saves money in the long run because you are not buying nappies that may not be right for your child!

Once you know what nappies suit your needs and how many you require, you can either start off slowly, buying one or two at a time (as your budget allows) or you can buy a bulk pack which usually gives you substantial long term savings compared to the retail price of single nappies!

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

It is a great idea to begin the switch to cloth. Toddlers come in all shapes and sizes, so first buy several nappies of different brands or styles to see what suits you and your toddler before investing in a large number of all the same type. The Australian Nappy Network has sample collections of nappies in most capital cities (need to check that!!!) and it is a great opportunity to see what different ones look like.

Fiona and Catherine from Darlings Downunder:

Unless your child is toilet trained it is almost never too late, economically speaking. At 12 months the average child can still have 4,500 or more nappy changes to go! At 2, they can look forward to another 6 months of nappying – maybe 1,000 nappy changes.

Where to start might depend on whether you are planning another baby.

If so, choosing a onesize nappy system that can be used for both children can be great since you know you’ll get the wear out of them.

If you want a nappy that can double as training pants, it can be worth looking at pocket nappies that close with snaps. When your child is ready for toilet training, use a smaller insert to catch any accidents, and fasten the nappy on a looser snap setting, making sure it’s loose enough for the child to pull them down like undies (but not so loose they fall off!). The snaps also make it easier to clean up poo accidents:-)

Kyra from Bubbalooba:

Modern cloth nappies aren’t really that much extra effort, especially if you have enough so you can wash every 2nd-3rd day.

Have a pack of environmentally friendly disposables handy in case of emergencies, but you will soon see how easy it is to use modern cloth nappies!

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

Switching to Modern Nappies is always a good idea! If you plan on having more children perhaps look at buying one-size-fits-most nappies so they can be used earlier on with the new one. Also look at sites that sell second-hand nappies, often is fantastic condition and it’s a great way to break into cloth nappies without the initial outlay while still spending way too much on disposables. However you can always just buy sized nappies knowing that if they don’t quite work for you, mcn resale value is pretty good so you can sell and by others instead.

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

Changing to cloth is ALWAYS a good idea at any age or stage!

I converted to cloth when my 1st child was 16 months and I was pregnant with my 2nd. My motivation behind it was that I didn’t want to be buying disposable nappies for two children!

We trialled the Pop In Original with a Dri Night Booster over a few nights and with the success, having found a nappy that worked well, we then took the plunge into full time cloth nappying.

Rebecca From Bean Sprout Bubba:

Yes, it is a good idea. Starting ‘late’ can have its benefits.

Firstly, toddlers wet much less than younger babies, so you may end up not needing to buy the usual recommended 20 nappies for full-time day/night use. 10-15 nappies in total might be sufficient to wash 1-2 days, and less if your toddler is toilet aware and beginning to use a potty/toilet.

Secondly, there is no need to buy one-size nappies (unless intending to try for another baby), so you could just buy medium or large nappies, which tend to be cheaper than one-size nappies. Alternatively you could got straight into cloth pullup nappies/trainers, or use side snapped nappies as pull up trainers if your child is ready to be toilet trained.

Thirdly, by starting ‘late’ your nappies would be in better condition than most after your child toilet trains. Second hand nappies that are in fantastic condition can attract a high resale value, can’t go wrong with that! 🙂

Thank you to all our nappy experts for their contributions,

The Winter Sponsors of the Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. You can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway or any other giveaway held on My Green Nappy.org.

It is also helpful to be reminded again that the modern nappies you buy can be re-sold again to a hungry market! Second hand cloth nappies are very popular – mums are experimenting with the nappy styles and brands to find the best fit for their baby, budget and lifestyle needs. You can re-coup half, at least a third, and maybe even more of the cost of your nappies when you are done with them.

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something new in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your search for the best way to start using cloth nappies with a toddler…

Did you start using cloth nappies when your baby was a toddler? (many mums do!) How did you get started?

Quick Modern Cloth Nappy Tip: Get enough cloth nappies to fit in your washing machine to do the lot at the same time. On washing day, use your cheapies or older less absorbent nappies.

Did You Know? The Nappy Style Windows are a shortcut to finding stores that offer over types of nappy styles and accessories.

June 22, 2010

Night Time Nappies! What Cloth Nappy Options Will Suit a Heavy Wetting Toddler?

Night Time Nappies! What Cloth Nappy Options Will Suit a Heavy Wetting Toddler?

Night time Nappies! This is the last barrier I face! What modern cloth solution will suit my ‘heavy wetting’ toddler?

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses. This is what Our Nappy Experts have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

On my boys I use a baby beehinds fitted nappy with a trifold booster inside and a wool or PUL cover over the outside. Nappy is saturated the next day but pyjamas and linen are dry. Initially it irritated bubs skin a little so I used the BBH magicals with the extra trifold inside too or put in a microfleece liner between nappy and bub.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

Rebecca has just published a series of posts on her blog on the ins and outs of nighttime nappies; be sure to take a look and read the comments for even more tips.

Cloth at Night: an Introduction

Part 1: Considering Cloth Nappies at Night-Time?

Part 2: Cloth at Night – Using Day Nappies as Night Nappies

Part 3: Cloth at Night – Using Dedicated Night Nappies

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

I love Mandy Mac Purple Nights for a heavy wetter, and they’ll fit up to five years old.

I also like Bumwear pull-up toilet training pants. Just add more inserts til it’s absorbent enough for your child – you can use the boosters from your old nappies.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

Night time nappies vary on each bubba, my son could sleep through the night in basically any nappy even a terry square but my daughter requires extra boosting so I use and organic AIO with either a bamboo and organic cotton booster – sometimes 2.

Eva from Oz Baby Trends:

We’ve used a number of night nappying option for our 2 children, a boy and girl. Both were heavy wetters, particularly from about 6-12 months when they’d consume 240 ml of milk just before bed! The only 2 nappies that ever lasted were 1) The Original Pop-In with dri-night booster and 2) The Sandman night nappy with a fleece or wool cover, available from Sustainable Hemp Products. And we tried A LOT of brands!

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Both of my younger boys were heavy wetters (and one still is!) and tummy sleepers too, and I designed my night nappies around this fact, trying to keep them trim and quick drying at the same time. They have also been successfully tried and tested with a variety of other babies and toddlers. I have been in the process of refining them even further over the last couple of months, and the result has been the creation of a new night time booster system which will be released shortly.
However, another solution for heavy wetters, without bulking up the nappy too much, is to use a woollen soaker in conjunction with any dedicated night nappy, which, in the early stages, I found just as effective with my two boys.

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

Consider beginning toilet learning with your toddler. Pop him on the potty before bed and when he wakes in the morning. This will reduce the amount that the night nappy needs to hold.

Fiona and Catherine from Darlings Downunder:

A superboosted fitted nappy, or a specialised night nappy (like Mandy Mac, Baby Beehinds or Bubblebubs make) with a fleece or wool cover.

You can also put boosters between the nappy and the cover if you need extra. Not necessarily the most elegant option but they should do the job.

Kyra from Bubbalooba:

Most of our pocket nappies are suitable for night time use – I suggest the soft cordoroy or minkee nappies – the key is absorbency! Simply add more inserts or you can buy a special night-time insert from our store.

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

Our Stuff ’em Silly night time pocket nappies are perfect for the heavy wetting toddler! Your toddler will not leak through our nappy that uses a combination of 200wt malden mills fleece and a hidden PUL layer.

You can stuff as many absorbent inserts in as needed and hallelujah dry nights for all!

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

The Pop In Original with the added Dri Night Booster works wonders through the night! I use it both on my nearly 3 year old and my 9 month old (who is still breastfed 2-4 times a night) and we have no leaks! To me that’s a winner.

Many customers have been stuck on trying to find a cloth nappy suitable for nights and have been pleasantly surprised once they have purchased a Pop In Night Time Trial Pack. The tri-fold bamboo/cotton is incredibly absorbent.

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

Even more night nappy options can be found in My Nappy Style Window for Night Nappies.

– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something useful in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your search for the best Nighty Nite Nappy:

Which brands of nighttime nappies are the BEST cloth night nappies for your family?

June 15, 2010

My Newborn and Cloth Nappies: What Should I Do?

The Sponsors of the first Green Promise Nappies are your Nappy Doulas for this series of ‘Congo Questions’.

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register to be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

Winter Green Promise Nappy Sponsors – Congo Advice #2

“I’m having a baby in a few months. I want to cloth nappy my newborn, but I am worried that I might ‘burn out’ with the effort! What is your advice for me?”

Ease into mumming. Ease into using cloth. Absorb the insights of the mums below! (and remember that cloth nappies may take a few washes to get to their optimum absorbency)

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses, and no doubt will gain a perspective on the question that relates well to your situation and needs. No-one sees what anyone else contributes until it is published here! This is what your Nappy Doula’s have to say about considering cloth nappying your newborn baby:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

Have some disposables. You are better off using several cloth nappies and then supplementing with disposables than using only disposables.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

There is no more effort really, than using disposables. You put them in a bucket and wash them at the end of the day. So, depending on how many nappies you own, it’s one wash every day, or every second day!

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

Even just one cloth nappy used regularly will reduce costs, landfill waste, and the carbon footprint of producing single-use nappies.

For example, using a cloth nappy once a day saves over $500 by the time your child is toilet trained.

I also found it easier to push “start” on the washing machine than run out to the supermarket when I ran out of clean nappies, and enjoyed the fresh air and sunshine while hanging them out (baby enjoyed playing with the pegs and passing the nappies to me).

My favourite nappies for ease-of-use would be Cushie Tushies Couture all-in-ones – no folding, no pins, and the stay-dry liner helps prevent stains, and six layers of bamboo means they’re absorbent enough for night use with my own children (heavy wetters may want to add a booster).

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

If you can fight through the 2 weeks it will just become second nature – try not to use any disposables even in hospital as it will affect your chances of using cloth nappies full time.

Kyra from E-Weez:

If you have support around, ask them to help with the washing! Also, making sure you have stash of 20 or so nappies is a good idea, this way you hopefully won’t be washing everyday. If you are having your baby in winter, it may be worth investing in a dryer (one that’s energy efficient would be better) or an electric drying rack to ensure that you can get your nappies dry.

Eva from Oz Baby Trends:

Don’t stress! Cloth nappying a newborn is far easier than most people image. Number 1: You don’t need to rinse or soak those newborn poos. Just pop them in a dry-pail, ensuring you wash everyday. Number 2: Pop the nappies through a rinse cycle in your machine, then through a wash. Let the machine do the work! Line dry for the best results as the sun will bleach any stains. If you’re worried about staining, use a liner (flushable or reusable).

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Don’t feel like you have to do everything! If you have a good supply of cloth nappies, don’t feel like you have to wash every day. Don’t be afraid to have a small supply of disposables on hand, especially while you are adjusting to being a new mum AND using cloth!! Lots of “clothie mums” find it easier to use disposables rather than cloth while they are out and about.

In all honesty, modern cloth nappies are just as easy to use as disposables, and they are alot easier to use than “old fashioned” cloth nappies. They don’t require any soaking and are as simple to wash as a regular load of washing!

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

My advice:
#1 – get breastfeeding well established
#2 – recover from birthing your baby
#3 – get as much rest as you can
#4 – accept help from all who offer and write a list of jobs on the fridge or near the phone to refer to. Remember to include washing and hanging out the wash in your list!

Kyra from Bubbalooba:

Modern cloth nappies aren’t really that much extra effort, especially if you have enough so you can wash every 2nd-3rd day. Have a pack of environmentally friendly disposables handy in case of emergencies, but you will soon see how easy it is to use modern cloth nappies!

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

What effort? My advice is to wipe any pre-conceived notions of what cloth napping involves and stop listening to those negative comments from people who have no experience in the modern cloth world. You won’t notice the extra washing loads when you already have to wash baby clothes and blankets all the time as well, you especially won’t notice if you use cloth from birth.
Using cloth isn’t going to be the thing that burns you out; if anything all those night time feeds will be the real test of your sanity. Plus receiving fluffy mail from the postman is a real mood booster at the best of time.
Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

I found it was great using a mix of Eco Disposables and Cloth Nappies within the first month. It was a life saver on those days when you’re just too tired to get the washing done (and no one really wants to help you by cleaning the nappies for you!). Once my second packet of Eco Disposables ran out in week 4 I was determined to go cloth full time since I had invested so much money into my cloth collection!

Don’t let yourself burn out or you might decide not to cloth at all – and it’s definitely worth going the cloth way if you can.

Michelle from Sustainable Hemp Products:

Modern Cloth Nappies don’t need all the soaking etc of days gone by. Statistics show that cloth nappies take 7 minutes out of your day which is a short time to save alot of money. Also a trip to the clothesline to hang them out will be a chance to get side for a wonderful dose of Vitamin D from the sun. Just pop bub in your baby carrier and they’ll get the fresh air too.

Fiona and Catherine from Darlings Downunder:

Don’t put too much pressure on yourself – no one expects you to have anything together at the beginning. Allow yourself some leeway. Use disposables if they give you the time to establish bonding and breastfeeding. If it’s important to you to use cloth exclusively, make sure that your partner/mum/any helper you have supports this and will help you in the early weeks. Newborn prefolds and covers are perfect to start with – easy to assemble, economical, and fast drying. If you like the convenience and ease of a newborn sized All-in-one and think that might make life easier then add some of those.

Then after you start to emerge from the fog of those first few weeks and have a washing system established, start introducing nappies that appeal to you.

Think you might like pockets? Try out two or three brands and see if they work for you. Like the idea of All-in-ones? Add some of those to your stash.

Baby has explosive, runny poos? Get come fitteds and use the covers you have and see if that helps. You don’t have to work out your entire nappying system beforehand. Start simply and as you adapt to your baby’s routine and the new household routine, adapt your cloth nappying.

Before long you will have established a system that works for you and your baby, one step at a time.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

Firstly, if you are given newborn disposable nappies, keep them, especially if this is the first time using cloth nappies. They may be a sanity saver in blur of the early days getting the hang of the needs of a newborn. In these crucial early days, please take care of yourself, the guilt over using disposable nappies is not worth it. But do get into cloth when you are ready.

Secondly, unless you have cloth nappied an older child before, don’t be too hard on yourself doing cloth with a newborn. It takes trial and error to get a nappy routine going, moreso with a newborn. If it feels like a blur of constant nappy changes day and night, it’s ok to take a break from cloth and go back to cloth when the poos/wees have ‘subsided’ a little!

Thirdly, there’s no need to worry about trying to get all the newborn stains out of the nappies. If a stain persists, a few washes and sunning will get them out eventually. As long as the nappies are washed in a working washing machine it is clean: stains are just superficial and not worth worrying over.

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something useful in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A few questions to you about your search for the best Newborn Cloth Nappy Solutions:

  • How would you recommend a new mum eases into using cloth nappies with a freshie little newborn baby?
  • How did you begin, if you started at the newborn stage?

June 8, 2010

Modern Nappies: Where To Start? I Have $50 To Spend, What Cloth Nappy Do I Buy?

Modern Nappies: Where To Start? I Have $50 To Spend, What Cloth Nappy Do I Buy?

“Where to start? I have $50 to spend, what cloth nappies or accessories do you recommend I buy at your store?”

Modern Nappies range in price, and this depends on a range of factors – the materials used (organic fabrics will cost more), where they are made, the degree of embellishments, the type of fastenings and designs, the type of waterproofing used or simply the fabric used as the ‘outer’ shell… Imagine you are given $50 from a rellie to spend on a gift for your baby or toddler. What nappy would you get?

The Winter Sponsors of the 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative were invited to contribute to this series of Congo Questions. Each donated a special cloth nappy to go out as a giveaway prize to become an ambassador for ‘Nappy Change’ as it stopped a disposable heading to landfill each time it is worn. This seasonal giveaway strives to reach 100 donated nappies in a future round, and you can register at any time to either play in the current giveaway (they go for 6 weeks at the start of each season) or register and be notified when the next round is set to begin! You can enter into the draw for one nappy, or all of them!

A reusable and washable nappy can last for years, even over a few children. The BIG question in cloth nappying is always “Which is the best cloth nappy to buy?” The answer is more complex, and yet simple really. Try a few out! What works for your baby won’t for another! Why? Some babies are chubby bubbies, others are skinni minis, some wee a LOT, others seem to poo all day when little! Some have pot bellies, others slim hips. You get the idea – all our nappy doula’s have experience fitting their nappies to different sorts of baby needs – be sure to email and Ask them their opinion on what would suit the needs of your baby, your budget and your values. (Perhaps you only want the most natural fibres near your baby’s skin.)

You’ll see a wonderful range of responses. This is what Our Nappy Experts have to say:

Amanda from Sweet Bubba Eco Store:

A sweet tooshie nappy, Munchskins baby massage oil, and a couple of biobaby organic cotton face washers.

Janine from Ninky Bear:

All of the nappies in my store are one-size-fits-all, so you don’t need to worry about sizings, which is great if you are new to cloth nappies. So I would suggest a nappy (I especially recommend the bonnibuns), and a packet of flushable liners, making nappy cleaning a breeze!

Emma from Brindabella Baby:

I would get two different nappies so you can compare the fit and try different styles. For example, a Monk N Bear all-in-one for $19.95, and a Bumwear pocket for $31. Or a Mandy Mac hemp fitted nappy for $18 and a Cushie Tushies all-in- one for $35.

Cassandra from New Age Nappies:

1 GroVia Hybrid

Kyra from E-Weez:

Starting with a Baby BeeHinds Petite All-In-Two ($31NZD) and an extra snap-in insert ($13.50NZD) is a good choice! These nappies are trim, easy to use and with an extra snap-in insert you can replace the soaker pad with a dry one at nappy change time. This means that you can get more use out of each individual nappy and save money! If you could squeeze out 20 cents more, I’d also recommend our Baby BeeHinds Minkee Trial Pack. This gives you two nappies at a 20% discount and you can try out both the trim Petite or the popular Minkee MagicAlls. This pack contains 1x Petite AI2 and 1x Minkee MagicAlls AIO.

Eva from Oz Baby Trends:

We don’t actually retail, but I’d recommend starting with a Pop-In Dream Dri ($36) and Dri-night Booster ($12) from one of our retailers. This will give you a good feel for the design of the nappy and its capabilities.

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

$50 at Ticklefish Tots can get you 2 complete standard AI2 nappies in any size! And for a smaller bub (newborn to around 8kgs) you can even get 2 fancier nappies! And 2 nappies is a great start!

Marnie from Noonee Wilga:

For your potty learning toddler, training pants are an ideal step to make during the transition out of nappies. Noonee Wilga OneWet Pants have the trim look and feel of underwear but absorb and contain any little accidents. Two pairs of OneWet Pants (choose between classic sewn side or side snapping versions) in your choice of snuggly polar fleece fabrics which are perfect for winter, or in natural cotton interlock for summer comfort will leave you with enough change from $50 to purchase a fleece potty cover. (or treat yourself and get a custom made soft and luxurious cloth pad for yourself. Don’t you deserve the comfort of cloth too??)

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

At Bean Sprout Bubba, most mums start off buying 2 x $25 nappies (postage not included). These include Bubba J Basics pocket nappies (sized S, M, L) which come with a bamboo trifold that can be folded into 3 for 6 layers of bamboo absorbency. Or buy 1 nappy (any nappy really) plus extra inserts for night use and a wetbag for going out. Mums who already have the basics e.g. terry flats could spare an extra $10 (including postage) to buy a white nappy sprayer at $55 + regular parcel postage.

Fiona and Catherine from Darlings Downunder:

If you buy a Monkey Doodlez TAG System (cover $18, set of 3 inserts $32) for $50, you get enough nappies for 3 changes in a row. If you’re changing 6 nappies a day, that’s half a day’s worth of nappies for $50! The inserts are not just rectangular pads, they are carefully designed and shaped, with elastic gussets to provide superior containment and prevent soiling of the cover, so that you can just change the insert and reuse the cover. It also has the plushest velour to sit against baby’s skin. As a bonus, you can use the cover over other nappies, both prefolds and fittteds. A really economical system that doesn’t compromise on quality and fit.

Kyra from Bubbalooba:

I recommend you buy 2 nappies and some cloth wipes – a great start to using to modern cloth nappies!

Nicole from Krap Katchers:

Grab yourself a Stuff ‘em Silly nappy and you won’t regret it, your baby will love waking up leak free in the morning! Although keep your eye out for our new designer wetbags, and luscious wipes and thirsty nappy inserts soon arriving in store, you could also pop a few of these into your shopping cart at the same time.

Jacquie from Cheeky Cherubs:

With $50 I would suggest the Pop In Night Nappy Trial Pack. This pack comes with your choice of either the Pop In Original or Pop In Dream Dri and a colour co-ordinated Dri Night Booster and at a discounted price. This is the nappy that converted me to cloth. I trialled it through the night and when it proved to not leak at all I knew I was on to a winner!

Michelle from Sustainable Hemp Products:

With $50- a little too hard but I would either buy some universal size boosters to add absorbency to any of your nappy brands to use for sleeps and as bub starts to wee more. My other decision would be to buy a Sandman night Nappy to give bub dry nights and save you lots of money and buy you lots of sleep.

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions, I really enjoy these articles. I like that I can benefit from the experience of other mums who use these nappies and have lots of insights and ideas and a broad perspective of what is popular (and thus effective) for different types of babies. Each brings their own thoughts into their contribution, which I feel gives us a well rounded and more natural way to build our own opinions on what our options are. Next week the question is about cloth nappies and a newborn baby – there will be some awesome advice about the things to focus on when you bring a little itty bitty freshie home!


– Our Nappy Experts –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Experts…

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something useful in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about your search for the best cloth nappy to start your stash…

What would YOU buy with $50 to spend on your first cloth purchase?

Powered by WordPress