My Green Nappy Discovering Modern Cloth Nappies and Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies

October 23, 2012

Why I DON’T Prefer Disposable Nappies Over Australian Cloth Nappies…

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Why I DON’T Prefer Disposable Nappies Over Australian Cloth Nappies…

Disposable Nappies are marketed as ‘Convenience’ Nappies, as in fact they aren’t really disposable – they persist in the environment for too long, whereas a cloth nappy will (mostly) degrade over time, and be used on several babies.

What encouraged you to make the switch to cloth nappies, when it is so simple to buy a bag each week at the shops…?

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Why I DON’T Prefer Disposable Nappies…

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Disposables are expensive (10 times more expensive than cloth) – if you buy disposables you’re giving your money to evil multinationals. Cheap disposables often cause severe nappy rash.  All disposables are full of chemicals, and potential risks include toxic shock syndrome.  Disposing of them causes mountains of pollution including human excrement in our landfill.  That rubbish will continue polluting our planet long after our lifetimes. I don’t buy disposables because I don’t want to buy rubbish, pollute the planet, or support evil multinationals.  As a consequence, our eco-footprint is small, our rubbish bin never stinks and we’ve saved about $10 000.

Carly from Pikapu Modern Cloth Nappies:

There are many reasons why we made the choice to cloth over disposables. Firstly our daughter was allergic to them (as they have all sorts of chemicals and gels inside them to make them work so who knows what you are putting on babies bum), with cloth we knew there were no harsh chemicals on babies bum, also the bin, with many disposable nappy parents they say they never have enough room in their bin for standard rubbish and that these nappies can take up to 500 years to decompose which is a frightful thought. So that means every nappy ever made is still sitting in landfill somewhere.

Then there is the cost, it may seem like a lot to fork out for a set of cloth nappies but that is then it. So for example a full time set of pikapu nappies is around $600 for 24 nappies and using disposables for 2 ½ years is around $3000, more if bub is in nappies for longer.

Then the cost is more if you have more children.

Then there is style, they look so cute and they make you feel good because you are doing something good for baby, good for the environment and good for your hip pocket, it’s a win for everyone.

In saying that there is no rule to say you have to go either way, you can always do both. Do cloth at home during the day and use disposables sparingly when you are out or overnight while you build confidence in switching to cloth.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

Cloth is just far superior. Its soft and luxurious for baby. They can wear the nappy as an outfit with a cute top in summer (and look so cute). Girls can wear a cloth nappy under a dress with no need for covers or bloomers. Cloth is also cheaper – money that can be spent on so many other things rather then nappies we throw in the bin!

And with a baby, whats an extra load of washing every few days.

A little anecdote – Our neighbours have two babies in disposables. Their bin is packed so full the lid is open each week. The other day the nappies were strewn all up our street and the parents were out there cleaning them up. It made me realise how full their bin was with nappies and how empty ours is without (and what a embarrassing and yucky job to pick up all those nappies).

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

Because I want lots of babies and don’t want to leave them a world full of used disposable nappies!

Kate from Bouncing Sprouts:

Expensive & full of nasty chemicals.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

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February 21, 2011

No More Blowouts for Your Baby Budget!

Do disposable nappies cause a ‘blow-out’ of your weekly baby budget?

Cloth nappies may seem expensive in the beginning but when you add it all up it’s a much cheaper option.

Disposable nappies are bought, used ONCE, then thrown in the bin. Then the next one is bought, used once, tossed in the bin, then the next… Each week the costs mount up, and then each new baby, the costs double, and with inflation, more than double. Modern nappies are bought ONCE, then used over and over again. They are tossed in the washing machine, which does all the cleaning for you! With each new baby, you can re-use many of your washable nappies, and get to buy new pretty things for expanding your stash too, as some ‘upgrading’ may be necessary (or wished for), depending on how many you have active in your day to day nappy stash. For today’s topic we’ve asked our Nappy WAHM’s about blow-outs: Nappy blow-outs and budget blow-outs.

Let’s see what they have to say: Why do modern cloth nappies mean no more budget blow-outs?

Mel of Little Para Pants:

I’ve heard the figure of $1000 per year for disposable nappies.  I know I don’t have that kind of money to just throw in a landfill.  If you can afford $25-30 every fortnight of your first pregnancy, you can have a really good stash by the time your baby’s born, and those nappies should last through two or more children.  That’s roughly $600 for around 20 nappies – even more if you buy a pack of flat terries one fortnight.  So $1000 a year for an average of 3 years, for an average of 2 kids, is $6000.  That’s ten times what you could spend on cloth nappies for both kids, and they might even last long enough for a third!

Louise of Scamps Boutique, NZ:

Budget wise – you don’t have to keep buying nappies especially if you go for one size.

Eva of Oz Baby Trends:

2c to 8c per nappy change as opposed to 33c to 68c …. I’d say it’s pretty obvious! The figures speak for themselves.<

Annette of Iish Fly:

Well if you can contain yourself, Modern Cloth Nappies can save lots of $$.  I spent a total of around $300 on Ella for materials to make her MCN’s.

Michelle of Issy Bear Nappies:

Because you can always buy them when they are on special. (Bulk Packs at Issy Bear Nappies)

Ashley of Cheeky Creations:

I hate wasting money and I don’t like buying things that I just throw away. Cloth nappies may seem expensive in the beginning but when you add it all up it’s a much cheaper option.

Carli from MiniLaLa:

No more blow-outs in budgets – I love that about cloth nappies! Not only do I not have to cringe at the thousands of dollars it might cost for disposables, but you can sell your used Modern Cloth Nappies and even get something back!

I hate wasting money and I don’t like buying things that I just throw away. Cloth nappies may seem expensive in the beginning but when you add it all up it’s a much cheaper option.

Bec from Baby Chilli:

I know how much I have spent on nappies and don’t have to worry about finding $30 in the tough times when the nappy box is running low, I always have them on hand.
Kelleigh from Miracle Baby:
As for budget blowouts, it does cost a bit to buy the nappies to begin with, but imagine how much you would spend buying all of your disposable nappies up front. A lot more! A little spent at the start means fantastic savings in the long run. Plus, immediate relief on the grocery bill!
Peggy from Fluffy Bubs:
Cloth nappies are cost effective. Even considering the cost of water and energy (washing and drying), it still ends up cheaper in the long run.
Sasha of Green Kids:
I really loved the fact that I didn’t have to add expensive nappies to my trolley every week! I used to smile as I walked past the nappy section each week, knowing that I had an extra $30 or $40 to spend on other more fun things!
– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

3 Recommended Resources about Modern Nappies here at My Green Nappy:
  1. Modern Cloth Mini Trends
  2. My Nappy Style Windows
  3. The 100 Green Promise Nappies Initiative

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A comment question to You about Nappy Blow-Outs… Tell us about an awkward nappy blow-out experience you have had with your baby…

Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

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February 10, 2011

Eco-Friendly Nappy Use: Nappies – 3 Ways to Use Disposable Nappies in an Eco Friendly Way

Eco-Friendly Nappy Use: Nappies – 3 Ways to Use Disposable Nappies in an Eco Friendly Way

Eco-friendly Nappy Use: How ‘green’ are the nappies your baby wears?

Can disposable nappies ever be eco-friendly?

Yes! When using disposable nappies you have choices that will reduce the carbon footprint of your family. A ‘hybrid’ stash will ease your eco-conscience – easily! In a moment we’ll look at 3 ways of using disposable nappies in a more eco-friendly way. (+1)

Of course you don’t think about landfill when using a disposable nappy on your baby; however we all know that this is less than optimal. When you roll out your wheelie bin full of smelly nappies, your eco-conscience does a little cringe…

As we are all busy, we don’t always have the time to research our options, and your Mum said that cloth nappies are such hard work, right? How can you reduce that environmental impact of using disposable nappies, and easily?

Let’s Consider 3 Ways to Use Your Disposables in a More Eco-Friendly Way.

1. Pre-cycle Your Disposable Nappies.

Pre-cycling is simply preventing excess waste coming into your home. When Using disposable nappies, the best way to do this is to buy in bulk! Bulk buying means less packaging waste, less to and fro shopping trips and the added benefit of a discount or special price.

2. Use Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies.

Yes, there are disposable nappies you can bury in your garden to turn into rich soil. There are varieties you can add to a worm farm or compost. Others have ‘earth friendlier’ components. Still more can be ripped open and flushed down the toilet. What if you bought a bag of more eco friendly disposables now and then?

3. Empty Wet Nappies into Your Garden.

Simply, the guts of each nappy is a gentle fertilizer. Emptying the nappy and scratching it in, covering it with mulch actually adds the same water retaining crystals that you can buy to help drought proof your garden. Then, a fraction of the usual waste amount goes into the bin. What if you did this with one each day? Watch your garden grow. If you are feeling squeamish, think of all that manure or blood and bone you add to your soil, use gloves and wash your hands!

What’s the +1? Hybridising Your Stash, Starting With 1 Modern Cloth Nappy.

A hybrid stash includes regular disposable nappies, eco-friendly disposable nappies, and modern cloth nappies. Just like a hybrid car, it combines old and new, mixes different types to give you the most flexibility, and best of all, the opportunity to reduce your carbon footprint. The ‘modern’ cloth nappy is different. It is shaped, it has simple fastenings, it doesn’t need soaking, and you have control over how big or small its environmental impact is. We have washing machines these days, too. They are simple to use. Especially if you start with just one. One ‘green’ nappy...

With a hybrid stash, you can begin your baby’s life on a foundation of growing sustainability.

As you discover more, all the tips and tricks, you’ll naturally raise a ‘lower carbon’ baby. Your conscience will earn great eco karma, and you will encourage those around you to start with one green nappy too.

Here’s your challenge:

If you acted on one of these ideas, which would be the best for your family? Buying your next lot as bulk disposables, grabbing a bag of eco friendly disposables each month, Emptying the occasional ‘convenience’ nappy under the bushes in the backyard and covering it with mulch, or Looking into hybridising your nappy stash, starting with one washable, reusable, modern cloth nappy?

Charndra invites you to win a modern cloth nappy on her site, My Green Nappy, by registering to play in one of the regular giveaways held on this informative and popular site.

You’ll discover great tips, secrets to finding bargains, and everything you need to know about green nappies and using any sort of nappy in a more environmentally friendly way.

By Charndra Josling

This article also appears on EzineArticles: Eco-Friendly Nappy Use: Nappies – 3 Ways to Use Disposable Nappies in an Eco Friendly Way

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

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Are you registered to play in our regular giveaways? Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

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January 10, 2011

Environmentally Friendly Living With a Baby in Nappies? Here Are 3 Tips to Save Money and Our Earth

Environmentally Friendly Living With a Baby in Nappies? Here Are 3 Tips to Save Money and Our Earth

Yes, you can make a difference with your baby when it comes to green living.

With one “green” nappy at a time, you are saving on the use of one disposable, and even more importantly, you are encouraging your neighbours to follow your leading example.

In a moment I will show you 3 ways of finding modern cloth nappies that will save you money, in case you are concerned about the initial outlay. (+1 bonus idea…) In fact, I can reassure you right now that there is no need to buy a full time stash until you have decided on the cloth nappy styles and brands that best suit your baby, lifestyle and budget.

What if you have 3 children? That is conservatively 18 thousand disposable nappies. You can reduce that number by using some environmentally disposable nappies that you can compost, worm farm or flush. You can use biodegradable nappy liners and nappy bags.

Let us consider 3 ways to find cheap modern cloth nappies in a nice, budget friendly way:

1. Use social networking sites to find great specials on your favourite reusable modern nappy brands.

Yes, many Australian and New Zealand nappy shops have ‘fan’ pages. So, show your support for any of the over 300 small Aussie or kiwi cloth nappy businesses and keep your eye out for giveaways, super specials, be privy to exclusive offers and learn about fun contests.

2. Check out the flourishing market in pre-loved washable nappies.

Buying secondhand cloth nappies is an excellent way to test drive new brands for less. When buying online, check the sites guidelines for safe purchasing. It is pretty easy though. Some are auctions, others are shopping cart based like any regular online shop. They are used nappies, so first be aware of what the nappy costs new. Best of all, that nappy can be sold again. A reusable nappy is a nappy which circulates, of course! Where to buy secondhand cloth nappies

3. Join announcement, mailing or newsletter lists for members-only specials.

Simply, most sites have a list of their customers and interested visitors who they contact periodically (usually monthly) with tips, specials, contests and news about their product range. They may be a ‘club’ with member only perks. Join the list of those shops offering your favourite nappy brands. Some offer repeat purchase discounts too, or a permanent discount for members. You can save a lot with this tip.

What is the +1? WIN a modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Perhaps the best type of cloth nappy is the one you WIN in a contest, simply by participating and having some fun! With one washable nappy in your baby’s wardrobe, you will know you are always doing your bit for our planet, as each time your baby sports even one cloth nappy on their bottom, you are saving the cost of that single use disposable nappy, deferring that cost for another time.

Here is your budget and eco challenge:

What if you acted on one of these 4 ideas, and bought your first or next modern cloth nappy only for less than the usual full price? You will benefit from these simple strategies for finding modern cloth nappies on a budget, reducing your expenses as well as the environmental footprint of your family.

You are doing your part!

Sharing information about what you can do to help with pollution control and be working together with your baby, your family and others with small children is a wonderfully responsible way to be doing your part in protecting the environment for future generations as well as saving you money.

Having a hybrid stash of a range of nappy types is a very responsible action you can take to reduce pollution and encourage other families to do their part as well in protecting our planet.

Charndra invites you to win a modern cloth nappy on her site, My Green Nappy, by registering to play in one of the regular giveaways held on this informative and popular site.

You’ll discover great tips, secrets to finding bargains, and everything you need to know about green nappies and using any sort of nappy in a more environmentally friendly way.

By Charndra Josling

This article also appears on EzineArticles: Environmentally Friendly Living With a Baby in Nappies? Here Are 3 Tips to Save Money and Our Earth

See more of my articles there…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

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Are you registered to play in our regular giveaways? Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

August 21, 2010

Greenwashing Alert! Deceptively Disposable Nappies?

What’s 1 aspect of disposable nappies that you find is often ‘green washed’ in the minds of the general public?

“Disposable Nappies” – as we know, they aren’t – they sit around in landfill for decades, and more.

What is greenwashing, and does it get applied to disposable nappies?

In a society that’s increasingly aware of its own negative impact on the natural world, it’s no surprise corporations compete for consumer approval by promoting themselves as environmentally friendly or green. Such promotions might be as simple as sprinkling product packaging with leafy logos or as involved as publicizing investments in emerging technologies. Organizations spend billions of dollars each year in an attempt to convince consumers that their operations have a minimal impact on the environment. But can you believe the claims? How much environmental marketing is simply greenwashing?

For today’s topic we’ve asked our Nappy WAHM’s about the perceptions of the general public when it comes to disposable nappies and the green movement. “Green washing” is alive and well, and the myths quickly permeate general knowledge, but are often just a case of creative advertising and clever marketing, not environmental care at all…

I’m pleased to have contributions from many friends of My Green Nappy included in this article. We have Emma from Brindabella Baby, Melinda from Avanappy, Mel from Little Para PantsLouise from Scamps BoutiqueEva from Oz Baby Trends, Inge from Earth KidzCassandra from New Age Nappies, Annette from Iish Fly, Michelle from Issy Bear NappiesAlisha from Baby Safari, Cindy from Ticklefish TotsAshley from Cheeky Creations, Carli from MiniLaLa, Tracey from Flattery, Bec from Baby Chilli,  Julie from Cloth For Comfort, Chris froBaby Bullfrogs, Kate from Nappy DaysMichelle from Sustainable Hemp Products, and Karen from Baby Blossom.

Greenwashing as a term was originally related to a hotel chain that made claims about being eco-friendly in the way their towels were washed, yet it was found to be nothing more than a promotional ploy!  According to Wikipaedia:

The term is generally used when significantly more money or time has been spent advertising being green (that is, operating with consideration for the environment), rather than spending resources on environmentally sound practices.

Let’s see what they have to say:

“What’s 1 aspect of using disposable nappies that you find is often ‘green washed’ in the minds of the general public?”

Emma of Brindabella Baby:

It’s OK because they make biodegradable disposables now.” Green wash – most people don’t use biodegradables. Of those who do, most use the ones readily available in supermarkets that are only 70% biodegradable – so there’s still a large quantity of nappy not breaking down in landfill. And even if you use a 100% biodegradable nappy, it won’t break down in landfill if it’s in a non-biodegradable plastic bag.

Melinda of Avanappy:

The chemical makeup of the absorbency layers.
Mel of Little Para Pants:
I keep hearing about the study that found cloth nappies use more water than disposables.  I think the study was assuming that you’re always washing your full stash at the same time.  I don’t know about anyone else, but the only time that’s ever happened here was before my son was born and he wasn’t wearing any yet!

Eva of Oz Baby Trends:

Eco Disposable brands. They still take a long time break down and only then under the right conditions. No matter how eco-friendly they might be (compared to normal disposables), they are still contributing to our disposable culture.
Inge of Earth Kidz:
That they are breathable. Duh, try putting plastic underwear on yourself!

Cassandra of New Age Nappies:

No worse than cloth re water use etc.

Annette of Iish Fly:

That using disposable saves on water in Australia’s arid environment. I find a baby in nappies tends to add an extra 2 loads a week, which in a front loader is around an extra 40-60 L a week, which is less than 1% of the average households water consumption. Another aspect  it promotes is that “It is ok to send hazardous body waste to landfill!

Michelle of Issy Bear Nappies:

The words ‘eco-friendly‘.’

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Well, no mention of the hundreds of years a disposable nappy takes to break down is certainly one thing …. Do you think companies who thrive from the sale of disposable nappies would stay in business if they publicised the fact that their product was not as eco-friendly as they would have us believe?

Carli from MiniLaLa:

Lots of people argue that cloth nappies use so much water, without realising how much water (amongst other things) goes into the production of disposables.

Tracey from Flattery:

There was a study done into the environmental impact of disposables/cloth (they came out on par with each other) the thing that frustrates me is that this study was carried out when cloth nappies were terry cloth squares – that required soaking in napisan (which is not used for nappies now) and water usage was based on pre-soaking and water guzzling top loaders and electricity usage included drying in a dryer not on the line!

Bec from Baby Chilli:

The amount of water it takes to make disposable nappies, plus of course the crude oil, trees and plastic consumption that goes into each and every disposable nappy.
Julie from Cloth For Comfort:
I have found speaking with hundreds of people in my experience at the markets, one aspect which is ‘green washed’ is the amount of water used in the making of disposable nappies compared to cloth. I can understand this from the point of view of those who have not had any education regarding modern cloth nappies as the clever disposable nappy marketing campaigns can insinuate that less water is used in the making of disposable nappies.
Although this is true for only one nappy, it is much more when you add up the thousands of disposable nappies used for each child compared to the environmentally sustainable crops such as bamboo which is commonly used in modern cloth nappies and also the water it takes to wash and clean the nappies too!
Chris from Baby Bullfrogs:
Just how toxic the chemicals are that are used in them – blerghh!
Kate from Nappy Days:
That disposables are actually really good for the environment and that parents need to be more worried about spending time with their baby instead of doing mountains of washing.
Alisha of Baby Safari:
They think they are saving water by using them, the don’t think of the water that has been used to manufacture the nappies.
Michelle from Sustainable Hemp Products:

Marketing not focusing on the negatives like landfill and pollution problems and chemical usage in manufacture.
Karen from Baby Blossom:
Disposable are biodegradable. Although many parts of a disposable may be, wrap it in plastic and put it in landfill.
It still takes hundreds of years to break down.

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

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If you are just visiting for the first time today, and have found something new in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

3 Recommended Resources about Greenwashing and reducing the impact of using disposables :

  1. Greenwatch: All you need to know about Greenwashing.
  2. “The Six Sins of Greenwashing.”
  3. Make your eco disposables more environmentally friendly by emptying them.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Visit the Supporters of My Green Nappy:
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May 5, 2010

Why NOT to Use Cloth Nappies: Haven’t You Heard Of Disposables?

Cloth Nappies? Haven’t you heard of disposables?

When hearing ‘cloth nappies’, many people have an image spring to mind of squares of smelly towelling nappies soaking in bleach, even to go further and think about fabric squares being rung by hand through a ringer and possibly boiled in a copper before being hung to blow in the breeze!
Obviously this is an outdated yet entrenched myth, as washing machines and driers have been around for quite some time! Nevertheless, snap reactions remain, and are frequently based on old ideas. Or rather, out of date ideas. Old ideas, like hanging nappies on the line to dry actually prolongs their use, sanitizes and bleaches them, reducing their environmental impact while giving you a bit of sun; an important part of feeling bright and refreshed. For this topic we’ve asked Your Nappy Doula’s the simple question:
Why NOT to Use Cloth Nappies? What’s the ‘reason’ that you hear the most & why is it wrong?

Why Not to Use Cloth Nappies: What’s the ‘reason’ that you hear the most & why is it wrong? As advocates of modern nappies, they talk to mums a lot, meet you at fairs, expos and markets, and pretty much hear a similar range of reasons why people don’t want to consider using cloth nappies. Although the fact that they are inquiring means they likely are still wondering anyway, as you can save a LOT of using modern nappies over disposables! The responses here will highlight the usual comments, and often explain why they are not precisely accurate…

I’m pleased to have contributions from many friends of My Green Nappy included in this article. We have Emma from Brindabella Baby, Melinda from Avanappy, Mel from Little Para PantsLouise from Scamps BoutiqueEva from Oz Baby Trends, Inge from Earth KidzCassandra from New Age Nappies, Annette from Iish Fly, Michelle from Issy Bear NappiesAlisha from Baby Safari, Cindy from Ticklefish TotsAshley from Cheeky Creations, Carli from MiniLaLa, Tracey from Flattery, Bec from Baby Chilli, Julie from Cloth For Comfort, Chris froBaby Bullfrogs, Kate from Nappy DaysMichelle from Sustainable Hemp Products, Karen from Baby Blossom.

Let’s see what they have to say:

“What’s the ‘reason’ that you hear the most & why is it wrong?”

Emma Davidson of Brindabella Baby:

“But doesn’t it waste water and use dangerous chemicals to wash cloth nappies?”

Quite a lot of water and chemicals go into making single-use disposable nappies. It’s better to buy a cloth nappy made from a waterwise fibre crop like bamboo, hemp, or organic cotton. And with dry-pailing wash methods, there’s no soaking or chemicals required – so it takes on average 1L of water to wash a cloth nappy.

Melinda of Avanappy:

Too much washing & you waste water washing them all the time.
Mel of Little Para Pants:
It’s too expensive.

So wrong.  Sure, the per-nappy cost is higher, but given you can reuse a cloth nappy for years, it’s almost not worth mentioning.  And who really wants a landfill full of disposable nappies still sitting around in 1000 years?  Eww.  What is that going to do to our water supply by then?

Louise of Scamps Boutique, NZ:

Too much work involved in washing them.

I don’t understand this comment as everyone washes clothes, towels, sheets etc, cloth adds 1-2 extra loads a week which is nothing when you are washing every day which most families do anyway.
Eva of Oz Baby Trends:
The excuse we hear most often is that people don’t want to clean poo off dirty nappies, but the fact is, even disposables should have the poo flushed from them first.

Inge of Earth Kidz:

Expensive.
Most people don’t even realise how much they spend on disposables. Hard work. What work? Turning your washing machine on?

Cassandra of New Age Nappies:

Too much washing.

Hello? 2 extra loads a week and the machine does it. Welcome to the 2000’s!

Annette of Iish Fly:

I don’t want to touch poo

Well then why are you a Mum? I hate vomit, but as a mum it’s hard to avoid it. You still have to clean up from blow-outs from disposables so why not scrub the odd cloth nappy!

Michelle of Issy Bear Nappies:

Too much work!

We wash our childrens’ clothes – why not wash their underwear just like we wash ours? Rinse, dry pail, then wash. EASY!

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Disposables are so much easier!

PFFFFFT! Modern cloth nappies are JUST AS EASY to use as disposables, without having to worry that the tab is going to rip off due to shoddy mass production, or that the inside is poorly or unevenly filled which renders the disposable useless before it has even been used! The quality of disposable nappies has certainly declined over the years.

Ashley of Cheeky Creations:

Most people say: “It’s too hard.”

They say they can’t be bothered washing them and hanging them out. But once you use them you love them so much that a lot of people actually enjoy washing and drying their nappies! For me it’s a nice break!

Carli from MiniLaLa:

The main excuse I hear for not using cloth is that people think:

“It is such hard work…”

Myth! It really couldn’t be easier! You put it on, take it off, pop it in a bucket, wash and dry. I always tell people that the tiny amount of extra work involved is worth it and more when you see how gorgeous your baby’s bot looks in a cloth nappy!

Tracey from Flattery:

What do i hear all the time…

“Awwww they’re cute but you have to WASH them”

It’s only 1 extra load per day – it’s not like we have to wash them by hand. Oh and my sister thought cloth nappies were expensive until I pointed out how much she spends on disposables every week!

Bec from Baby Chilli:

“Washing, I cant be bothered to wash then all the time.”

I figure you have to wash anyway so whats another load every few days, you don’t need to soak them or do anything special to them. They use much less detergent to clean them and if you put them in a wash bag then you don’t have to touch them again till they are nice and clean.
Julie from Cloth For Comfort:
“It would be too much work”
I hear this comment EVERY market I attend and make sure that person at least leaves with one of my brochures to explain the concept. I am going to launch my new website in the coming months and my new slogan will be Cloth for Comfort – Modern Cloth Nappies. Hard work? Think again!
Chris from Baby Bullfrogs:
“Oh it’s too time-consuming” or “It doesn’t really help the environment any more than disposables, there’s a lot of water wastage, detergent use…”
Kate from Nappy Days:
Waste of family time” and that “Washing and folding them takes forever
It takes no longer to use and wash cloth nappies today than it does to use and dispose of disposable nappies.
Alisha of Baby Safari:
I have been told it will increase nappy rash, in my case that has not been true as neither of my children suffer from nappy rashes.
“Too much work.”

Wrong because you don’t soak anymore and the washing machine does the work!
Karen from Baby Blossom:
“Cloth nappies are way too much work.”  “Cloth nappies give nappy rash.”
I guess these are the two biggest myths why people won’t use cloth that I come across.
Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,
P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

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If you are visiting for the first time today, and have found something new in this article, be sure to register & receive My Green Nappy Guide, you’ll be both relieved and excited at the things you will discover!

A question to you about reactions you get about using cloth nappies…

“When You Say “I use cloth nappies”, what’s the most common reaction you get? Is the reaction beginning to change where you live?”

April 21, 2010

Eco-Advocate, I Am! #1 Eco-Friendly Reason To Use A Cloth Nappy…

Modern Nappies: Environmentally Friendly Cloth Nappies.

Every cloth nappy shop you visit will provide you with information about the environmental benefits of modern cloth nappies. Have a look at their explanations, their motivations for promoting modern nappies as an environmentally friendly alternative to disposable nappies.

For today’s topic we’ve asked our Nappy WAHM’s about the main environmental concern that drives them to supply you with modern cloth nappies as a way to reduce the collective environmental impact of our babies.

I’m pleased to have contributions from many friends of My Green Nappy included in this article. We have Emma from Brindabella Baby, Melinda from Avanappy, Mel from Little Para Pants, Louise from Scamps Boutique, Eva from Oz Baby Trends, Kyra of Bubbalooba, Cassandra from New Age Nappies, Annette from Iish Fly, Michelle from Issy Bear Nappies, Cindy from Ticklefish Tots, Ashley from Cheeky Creations, Carli from MiniLaLa, Tracey from Flattery, Bec from Baby Chilli,  Julie from Cloth For Comfort, Chris from Baby Bullfrogs, Kate from Nappy Days, Michelle from Sustainable Hemp Products and Karen from Baby Blossom.

Let’s see what they have to say:

“What is the main environmental reason you promote & support families in using cloth nappies?”

Emma Davidson of Brindabella Baby:

Less landfill. Even biodegradable nappies add to the long-term landfill problem when they’re wrapped in non-biodegradable plastic garbage bags. Reusable cloth nappies just make sense.

Melinda of Avanappy:

Less rubbish going to landfill and a lower environmental impact. A stash of MCN uses less resources to make & launder than to make enough disposables to last a child from birth to toilet training.

Mel of Little Para Pants:
I don’t like buying things I just end up throwing away.

Louise of Scamps Boutique, NZ:

Reduces the amount of rubbish you put out each week
Less landfill! Just because we in Australia have the space to fill, doesn’t mean we should!
Cassandra of New Age Nappies:

Less waste going into our tips plus disposing of waste matter in the toilet – the correct way.

Annette of Iish Fly:

Because of all the landfill issues. Just because we have the space in Australia why do we need to use it as landfill? I would rather see rolling hills any day over mountains of plastic disposable pee pockets.

Michelle of Issy Bear Nappies:

It would have to be landfill. It is like people dropping rubbish out of their car windows. Where do they think the rubbish goes?

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

Reducing landfill! I have found that having 2 kids in nappies, by converting to cloth, we reduced our garbage output by over 50% PER WEEK!

Ashley of Cheeky Creations:

To stop all the landfill associated with disposables. A lot of people think disposables are better for the environment because you aren’t using all the water to wash them. But not many people realise the amount of water used to make disposables.

Carli from MiniLaLa:

I believe that the amount of disposable nappies (plastic and chemicals) going to landfill is horrific, and by making a change as simple as using cloth nappies, we can make such a massive difference without any inconvenience or trouble. I want to help people realise that they can make a difference to the environment without it making a difference to their lives.

Tracey from Flattery:

To keep it blatantly simple – and not even go into the terrible strain on earth that is the manufacturing of disposable nappies – just the landfill alone is enough.

Bec from Baby Chilli:

Landfill! When travelling we use disposables and I am shocked at how fast we fill up a bin with just nappies, its so sad to see and I get very disheartened when I think about most people with babies doing this every week!

Julie from Cloth For Comfort:
Cloth nappies promote the responsible use of our natural resources including using less water, landfill and electricity compared to disposables – this is vital as once these resources are gone, they can’t be easily replaced or substituted.

Chris from Baby Bullfrogs:

Land Fill – just knowing how long it takes to break down one disposable nappy surely is enough reason to convert anyone to cloth! (Every disposable ever created still exists today – what a horrible, horrible thought!)

Kate from Nappy Days:

Because many parents have no idea that our landfills are filling up in New Zealand and that soon we will have nowhere to put our waste so we have to use as many re-usable products as possible.

Michelle from Sustainable Hemp Products:

The 1.75 billion disposables that go into landfill every year in Australia and New Zealand alone.

Karen from Baby Blossom:
People use cloth for so many reasons. Our family wanted to use cloth for the environmental aspects. We started small and simple but of course with so many cute and funky nappies and nappy sets it doesn’t take long to grow into something more fashionable.
– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.
Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

3 Recommended Resources helping you to be eco-friendly:

  1. Trees for Life
  2. Greenwala Community
  3. The Planet Green Game – this is COOL! It is an online game in which you go around a virtual town and make it ‘greener’ by answering questions and discovering more facts about global warming and what we can do to make a difference.

A question to you about eco-friendly living:

What’s one eco-friendly thing your family does that you would like to share with readers of My Green Nappy?

January 1, 2010

Thinking Green? Which Environmental Issue Concerns You the Most?

“We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.” Native American Proverb

Win a Green Nappy Kit

So many Environmental Issues are effecting our Earth

Which environmental issue concerns you the most as a parent?

Air pollution, shrinking ice caps, fresh water resources, population pressure, global warming, the ‘disposable’ mindset, loss of biodiversity, habitats, damage to ecosystems, and more pressures on our only planet…

For today’s topic we’ve asked our Nappy Doula’s which environmental issue they are most concerned about at the moment.

I’m pleased to have contributions from many friends of My Green Nappy included in this article. We have Emma from Brindabella Baby, Melinda from Avanappy, Mel from Little Para Pants, Louise from Scamps Boutique, Eva from Oz Baby Trends, Kyra of Bubbalooba, Cassandra from New Age Nappies, Alisha from Baby Safari, Annette from Iish Fly, Michelle from Issy Bear Nappies, Cindy from Ticklefish Tots, Ashley from Cheeky Creations, Carli from MiniLaLa, Tracey from Flattery, Bec from Baby Chilli, Michelle from Sustainable Hemp Products, Kelleigh from Miracle Baby, Julie from Cloth For Comfort, Peggy from Fluffy Bubs , Kate from Nappy Days, and Sasha from Green Kids.

– Thank you for your thoughtful contributions,

Charndra

Let’s see what they have to say:

“What Environmental Issue Is Of Most Concern To You Right Now?”

Emma of Brindabella Baby:
The use of chemicals and water irrigation to grow food and fibre crops really worries me. These practices contribute to pollution run-off in waterways, mis-use of our previous water resources, and health problems for workers (and consumers, in the case of food crops in particular).
With so many eco-friendly fibre alternatives – hemp, bamboo, and organic cotton for example – modern cloth nappies are a better way to use water resources. For example, lots of water and chemicals are used to produce single-use disposable nappies – but it takes on average only 1L of water to wash a cloth nappy, and the original fibre crop can be grown without irrigation or chemicals.

Melinda of Avanappy:

Shrinking Ice Caps, Loss of Habitats & Eco systems.
Mel of Little Para Pants:
The disposable mindset.  All those cheaply made single-use products have to go to landfill, and there’s only so much space available.

Louise of Scamps Boutique, NZ:

The amount of rubbish humans create and exactly what is going to happen as the worlds population increases

Landfill. I think we’re seeing a reduction in disposable use in countries like the UK where space is at a premium, but here in Australia, people are still very blasé about it because we have the space.

Kyra of Bubbalooba:

Currently I have been trying to use less and less disposable items – it just amazes me how much waste people create! I am in the process of making handkerchiefs, reusable dish cloths, …I’m a bit of a hoarder, so I hate to throw things out!

Cassandra of New Age Nappies:

Gosh….. Shrinking ice caps…

Annette of Iish Fly:

As I have relocated to Goulburn in the last 12 months, the recent drought has changed the way I think about water. Water conservation is the biggest concern I have at this point in time. The second would be the 2 disposible nappies I buried in my garden 2.5 years ago, and dig up from time to time to see if they have decomposed at all. 2.5 years later they still are there and still have yet to decompose even by (More than willing to supply photos)

Michelle of Issy Bear Nappies:

Land fill with all those smelly disposable nappies!

Alisha of Baby Safari:
Water Resources are a big concern of mine, the thought of low water storages and people wasting it on washing pavements etc just saddens me. Population pressure and pollution come a very close second.. and third!

Cindy from Ticklefish Tots:

The disposable mindset and landfill issues…

Ashley of Cheeky Creations:
Global warming is of the most concern to me. I’m also really concerned with the amount of waste we produce.

Carli from MiniLaLa:

Absolutely global warming and it’s effects. The extreme weather which in so many ways directly affects the Earth that we are leaving for our children.

Tracey from Flattery:

All of the above – modern society is so irresponsible – just making the quickest easiest choice and damn the consequences…

Bec from Baby Chilli:

Pollution, air and ground,  water resources and global warming…
All of the above!
Kelleigh from Little Miracles:
I have three.
One is our throw away / disposable society. It is easy to keep replacing things that probably don’t need replacing and therefore putting a strain on resources and the Earth it is disposed in.
The second is pollution from cars and factories which does affect health, and may be affecting climate change.
The third is how reliable we are on shopping for all of our food, when we could be growing some of our own. Even a small garden can grow plenty of fruit and vege. Maybe by growing more of our own food we could be eating more natural foods, and perhaps having a hand in reducing global food shortages.
Julie from Cloth for Comfort:
My key concern is the consumption of our natural resources for the sake of convenience.
Peggy from Fluffy Bubs:
I think the biggest issue at the moment is global warming. How can it not be? The weather is crazy and unpredictable, and it has been proven that each year is getting ‘warmer’ than the next.
Kate from Nappy Days:
Landfills filling up fast – we can all see it is happening but some are continuing to turn a blind eye and keep pretending that everything will sort itself out……or some couldn’t care less gthey just keep chucking everything out in the trash and continue to buy everything triple wrapped for freshness.
Sasha of Green Kids:
It is difficult to choose one issue, but I guess a sweeping way of describing what concerns me is sustainability. As a society we have become used to waste and excess, and I am concerned about how long the earth will be able to keep up, especially with the rapidly increasing population. Whether we are talking about energy, water, resources or farming practices, I think it is really important that we all start making the tough decisions, rather than just the quick and easy/cheap solution, so we can ensure that the earth is still a nice place to live in the future.

All the little things add up...

You can see that everyone shares in the concern for our world, particularly as we will be leaving it for our precious families. I know I have a simmering feeling of worry over the many issues, which changes as I learn more about what is going on around the world. Right now I think the environmental issue that bothers me the most is water – I think access to water is a massive issue, and have read in more than one place that Water will be one of the biggest issues during the lifetime of our children. That there will be conflict over water more than oil! A sobering thought.

Thank you to all our nappy doula’s for their contributions,

P.S There is a question at the bottom of each of these features. Join in the conversation and share your own experiences and stories with us…

– Your Nappy Doulas –

This is part of a regular series of articles that offer you an insight into the beliefs, concerns, knowledge and wisdom of Mums making and selling modern cloth nappies in Australia and New Zealand.

Discover More from Your Nappy Doulas…

3 Recommended Resources to Discover More about Environmental Issues are:

1. Do the Green Thing – 7 Things You Can Do to Lead a Greener Life.

2. Planet Green – Solutions-oriented tips to help you make your life a little (or a lot) greener.

3. Resources for Sustainable Living: Australia – Sustainable Living Foundation New Zealand – Sustainable Living

A Question for You About Environmental Issues:

Which environmental issue concerns you the most as a parent?

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