My Green Nappy Discovering Modern Cloth Nappies and Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies

September 27, 2011

What Every Parent Should Know About Nappy Fabrics

What Every Parent Should Know About Nappy Fabrics

When you’re just starting out in the cloth nappy world, it can be a bit confusing seeing all these different fabrics talked about that you may never have heard of before. “Hemp?” you may say. “Isn’t that a drug? And I thought bamboo was what pandas eat. How can that be comfortable as a nappy?”

By Melissa Smith of Little Para Pants

Relax. I’ll spell it all out for you.

Absorbent fabrics – bamboo, hemp, cotton, wool

Bamboo is a grass native to China; and yes, pandas eat it. Bamboo fabric is made from the fibres inside the canes. It is very soft – possibly the softest nappy fabric available – and can absorb about three times its own weight. Bamboo fabric does have a downside, however, and that is the fact that the process of making bamboo into fabric is patented by a single company in China. It is a bit more expensive than other fabrics. It’s usually blended with another fibre, such as cotton, to make it more durable. Bamboo shoots grow up to three metres a day, and because it’s a grass, they keep growing after they’re cut, so it’s a very sustainable crop.

Hemp is another popular fabric. It is made from the cannabis plant, but a different variety than the one used as a drug. Hemp is durable, versatile, absorbent, and can be grown in any climate. It has natural antibacterial properties, making it a good choice for babies with nappy rash. Hemp has been made into rope, paper, fabric, plastic, plywood, and many other things. For nappies, it’s a great middle-of-the-road fabric when you want something absorbent yet affordable.

Cotton is ubiquitous. It is durable, widely available and inexpensive. However, it requires a lot of water to grow, and for this reason, many environmentally conscious parents choose to use it sparingly. It is not as absorbent as hemp or bamboo but is often used in combination with both.

Wool is a bit different to these other fabrics. You’ll see wool most often as a nappy cover. In addition to being absorbent, wool is water resistant. Many parents find that a bamboo fitted nappy plus a wool cover is their best overnight nappy combination. The wool will help to absorb more liquid while still keeping clothes and bedding dry.

Stay-dry fabrics – Suedecloth, microfleece, polar fleece

Stay-dry fabrics are synthetic. Because of this, some babies develop rashes from them.

Suedecloth is a synthetic fabric which is soft on the ‘right’ side and smooth on the ‘wrong’ side. It is often used in pocket and all-in-one nappies to keep moisture away from baby’s skin. It’s comfortable and doesn’t tend to stiffen up after washing the way many fabrics do. It costs a bit more than the other synthetics I discuss later on, and is generally only available to purchase online. One of the nice things about suedecloth is that solid matter doesn’t stick to it – it just slides off into the toilet easily!

Polar fleece is inexpensive, thick, and can even be made from things like recycled plastic bottles. Again, this does present a possibility for synthetic reactions. Polar fleece is often used for covers or liners. It isn’t waterproof, so if you’re using it as a cover, you may get compression leaks if your child is a particularly heavy wetter.

Microfleece is similar to polar fleece, but thinner and softer. It’s generally used in pockets and as nappy liners. Like suedecloth, microfleece repels solid matter, so it’s easy to clean up. It costs less than suedecloth but is a bit less breatheable.

Waterproof fabrics – PUL

PUL stands for polyurethane laminate. This is a synthetic coating laminated onto the back of fabrics to make them waterproof. This makes it perfect for things like cloth nappies, cloth menstrual pads, wet bags, and breast pads, where you need to keep moisture contained. Most waterproof fabrics do not breathe easily, but for some reason that I don’t pretend to understand, PUL actually does breathe. And breatheability is something you definitely want in a nappy. You want air to circulate around your child’s genitals to keep them from becoming too hot.

PUL is available in all colours of the rainbow and many different prints. You can get it in 1 mil or 2 mil thicknesses. It is most commonly laminated onto polyester fabrics but you can also get cotton and minky/minkee fabrics as PUL.

– Melissa from Little Para Pants in South Australia

Because Cute Babies Deserve Cute Nappies!

Article Source

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners

We cannot display this gallery

August 23, 2011

28 Things to Do With Flat Terry Squares

28 Things to Do With Flat Terry Squares

Flat terry squares get a lot of bad press, but they’re so versatile that no cloth nappying household should be without them!

By Melissa Smith of Little Para Pants

Here are just a few things they’re good for:

  1. Fold into a nappy.
  2. Fold into a booster.
  3. Fold into a pad for postpartum use.
  4. Soak up leaking breastmilk.
  5. Wipe up poo leaks.
  6. Use as a burp rag.
  7. Clean up spilled drinks.
  8. Fold up and put on your lap to stop the laptop fan burning your leg.
  9. Makeshift bib.
  10. Wrap your placenta in one if you’re doing a lotus birth.
  11. Clean your car.
  12. Emergency towel.
  13. Handkerchief.
  14. Change mat.
  15. Toddler superhero cape.
  16. Clean your windows.
  17. Clean up after toilet training accidents.
  18. Soak up a flood in the laundry/bathroom/kitchen.
  19. The coloured ones can be used for play – blue for water, green for grass, yellow for desert, and so on.
  20. Use them to pick up undesirable objects (poo logs, dead rodents & spiders, mystery food).
  21. Use as cushioning when packing breakables away for storage.
  22. Having a home birth? Use some to clean up, and if baby comes quicker than you expected, you can wrap him/her in one till you find the clothes & blankets!
  23. Old ones can be used as bedding for pets.
  24. Cut them up to make boosters, fitted nappies, or cloth menstrual pads.
  25. I’ve heard of one little boy who always insisted on sleeping with a terry square on his face!
  26. When they’re thin, full of holes, and useless for anything else, turn them into compost!
  27. Fold up & put under a refluxy baby’s head when sleeping.
  28. Use as a liner in wraps. If the nappy leaks, you only need to change the nappy and the wrap stays clean.

Can you think of other Things to Do With Flat Terry Squares ?

Please share and I’ll add them in!

– Melissa from Little Para Pants in South Australia

Because Cute Babies Deserve Cute Nappies!

Article Source

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners

We cannot display this gallery

January 31, 2011

Meet Our Guest: Little Para Pants

Little Para Pants

Let’s meet Mel, the proud owner of Little Para Pants:

Hi! I’m Mel and I live in Adelaide, where it’s hot and dry today. I have a husband Darrin, son Caleb who’s almost 4, and another son Ian who died at the age of two days. We have three cats and three chickens, and plan to add two more chickens to our brood soon!

Little Para Pants began when Caleb was about three months old. The terry squares we were using just weren’t enough for this heavy wetting boy. So I found some tutorials and patterns online and started to sew some Modern Cloth Nappies. As I got better at it, friends told me they were good enough to sell, so I set up the business. Since then I’ve expanded from one single pattern to several, and many cloth nappy accessories as well.

What bugs me most is the culture we live in, where we told we can’t live without things that we really don’t need! For instance, when preparing for a new baby, most people assume you need a cot, a pram, and a mountain of bottles. Yet for thousands of years before these items were invented, parents and babies got by just fine – in fact thrived – by cosleeping, babywearing, and breastfeeding.

When you visit Little Para Pants, make sure you have a look at…

1. One Fit Wonders –  This is a one-size-fits-most all-in-one nappy with pocket. Use it as is during the day, or add the trifold at night for a super absorbent nappy!
2. Swim Nappies –  Side snapping with PUL and fold-over elastic to minimise leaks
3. Cloth Sandwich Wraps – A velcro-fastening square to keep your sandwiches fresh!

3 of my favourite sites are:

1. Joyous Birth – Australia’s home birth community
2. Scarlet Eve – Beautiful and comfortable cloth menstrual pads!
3. OZ Handmade – Your home for handmade things in Australia

Meet Our Guests... Meet Our Guests
– This is a regular feature of My Green Nappy in which family friendly sites are invited to contribute a post about their website. You’ll discover a bit about their ideas, specialties, what motivated their passion and what concerns them about the environment.
Find out more about our guests…

Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaway competitions?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

We cannot display this gallery

Powered by WordPress