My Green Nappy Discovering Modern Cloth Nappies and Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies

November 1, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies: Help! Don’t Know Where To Start? How About The Mini Stash…

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Australian Cloth Nappies: Help! Don’t Know Where To Start? How About The Mini Stash…

How Part Time Cloth Nappies Saves Money and is an Easy Way to Convert From Disposables to the Modern Cloth Nappy…

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below, or on facebook.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Modern Cloth Nappy Newbie Help! Don’t Know Where To Start? How About The Mini Stash… 

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

If you don’t know where to start…try one of everything! Cloth nappies work differently for different babies and you have to buy what suits you (not what has the highest rating score or what your sister bought). The only way you will find out what suits you is by trying one of each type of nappy.

If you are not sure what you need, we recommend that you purchase a package that has at least one of the following:

  • a pocket nappy. Try Green Kids’ Anytimes nappies.
  • a fitted nappy. Try Itti Bitti D’Lish.
  • a one size nappy. Try Cushie Tushies, Grovia Hybrid, Bitti Tutto or Ones&Twos.
  • an all in one (AIO) nappy. Try Tots Bots Easyfit or the GroVia AIO;
  • a snap in one (SIO) nappy. Try the GroVia Hybrid.

You might also want to purchase a wet bag for storing nappies when you are out and about.
See our “New to Cloth – One of Everything” pack in our Nappy Packages section of our website). Our pack has one of each of the above types of nappies in it. We have selected the best selling nappies from each category to take the guess work out of it for our customers.

Buying a pack from a retailer (rather than the manufacturer directly) is the best way to go as you will save on postage because you can buy all the nappies in one spot. A retailer will also be able to provide you with unbiased opinions on what works for them and what sells best so having a chat to a retailer is also a good idea.

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Just get 3 or 5 to start with, so you can use them all in one day, wash them that night, and they’re ready again tomorrow (go for quick to dry nappies, like pockets).  You’ll get a good idea quicker if you have a full day in cloth.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

If you’re new to cloth nappies, then a mini stash is a great way to start.  It gives you chance to build up your collection slowly, finding out what works for you and your baby, and means that you aren’t spending a lot of money all at once.  Try out a few different styles and brands, maybe buying second hand to begin with, until you find what really works for you.  Try using the nappies at home to begin with, and then build up to using them full time over time.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

When my last baby was born we started out with disposables.  After a week or two, I started using MCN just at home, during the day.  When I ran out of the cloth nappies, I’d use disposables again until the cloth nappies were washed & dry.  Slowly over time I was able to find enough time to sew more nappies till we had a big enough stash to switch over completely.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

If you want easy I would go for an AI1 (all in one) or an AI2 (all in two)  – that way you change the whole system when it comes to changing. Then you can move onto the other types out there once you are more aware of whats available.

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

A mini stash is a great way to begin using cloth!

Start by choosing a few different styles of nappies you think you’d be interested in using, trial packs are a great option for this. Once you have compiled a small stash of 6-8 nappies and given them a couple of pre-washes, allocate one day in your week to be a Cloth Day. 6-8 nappies should be enough for the day, and then you can wash that night.

If you don’t feel like 8 nappies is enough for a whole load of washing, give the nappies a good rinse and throw them in with your other washing, avoid using fabric softeners. You might like to continue doing this for a little while until you feel comfortable using cloth full time, or you may just want to use cloth when at home.

Once you have more experience using the nappies you have, you are able to confidently add more nappies to your stash using the styles & systems you prefer.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

If switching to cloth a ‘mini stash’ is a great way to trial a few nappies styles to see which one you find yourself impatiently watching to dry so you can pop it back on your babies bottom.  It is also a great way to ease yourself into using cloth nappies. Whether you start using them at home during the day and then when you’re feeling more confident using them out and about/ during the night, add more to your stash to go ‘full time’.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

Its great to try a mix of different brands and nappy styles but the best advice is shop to your budget. 5-10 nappies is a great place to start part time just to try things out. (Even if you decide to never go full time using 5-10 cloth nappies each week makes a difference.) Think about what is important to you in a nappy, do you want something that dries quickly, something that you won’t need to put together after washing before its ready to use, something made of all natural fibres, something to fit for a long time? Talk to other nappy users and get their opinions of what works for them and an explanation of whats what in the nappy world – there are heaps of pages online where you can connect to the nappy community, I know because I run one of them! The nappy world can be a little confusing but its also a pretty friendly place and all MCN lovers/users love to share the love of cloth!

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Using cloth doesn’t have to be all or nothing, you can use a combination of cloth and disposable. Starting with a mini stash will mean you have less outlay in the beginning and you can get a feel for whether cloth nappying is something that you can be comfortable with.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


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October 23, 2012

Why I DON’T Prefer Disposable Nappies Over Australian Cloth Nappies…

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Why I DON’T Prefer Disposable Nappies Over Australian Cloth Nappies…

Disposable Nappies are marketed as ‘Convenience’ Nappies, as in fact they aren’t really disposable – they persist in the environment for too long, whereas a cloth nappy will (mostly) degrade over time, and be used on several babies.

What encouraged you to make the switch to cloth nappies, when it is so simple to buy a bag each week at the shops…?

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Why I DON’T Prefer Disposable Nappies…

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Disposables are expensive (10 times more expensive than cloth) – if you buy disposables you’re giving your money to evil multinationals. Cheap disposables often cause severe nappy rash.  All disposables are full of chemicals, and potential risks include toxic shock syndrome.  Disposing of them causes mountains of pollution including human excrement in our landfill.  That rubbish will continue polluting our planet long after our lifetimes. I don’t buy disposables because I don’t want to buy rubbish, pollute the planet, or support evil multinationals.  As a consequence, our eco-footprint is small, our rubbish bin never stinks and we’ve saved about $10 000.

Carly from Pikapu Modern Cloth Nappies:

There are many reasons why we made the choice to cloth over disposables. Firstly our daughter was allergic to them (as they have all sorts of chemicals and gels inside them to make them work so who knows what you are putting on babies bum), with cloth we knew there were no harsh chemicals on babies bum, also the bin, with many disposable nappy parents they say they never have enough room in their bin for standard rubbish and that these nappies can take up to 500 years to decompose which is a frightful thought. So that means every nappy ever made is still sitting in landfill somewhere.

Then there is the cost, it may seem like a lot to fork out for a set of cloth nappies but that is then it. So for example a full time set of pikapu nappies is around $600 for 24 nappies and using disposables for 2 ½ years is around $3000, more if bub is in nappies for longer.

Then the cost is more if you have more children.

Then there is style, they look so cute and they make you feel good because you are doing something good for baby, good for the environment and good for your hip pocket, it’s a win for everyone.

In saying that there is no rule to say you have to go either way, you can always do both. Do cloth at home during the day and use disposables sparingly when you are out or overnight while you build confidence in switching to cloth.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

Cloth is just far superior. Its soft and luxurious for baby. They can wear the nappy as an outfit with a cute top in summer (and look so cute). Girls can wear a cloth nappy under a dress with no need for covers or bloomers. Cloth is also cheaper – money that can be spent on so many other things rather then nappies we throw in the bin!

And with a baby, whats an extra load of washing every few days.

A little anecdote – Our neighbours have two babies in disposables. Their bin is packed so full the lid is open each week. The other day the nappies were strewn all up our street and the parents were out there cleaning them up. It made me realise how full their bin was with nappies and how empty ours is without (and what a embarrassing and yucky job to pick up all those nappies).

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

Because I want lots of babies and don’t want to leave them a world full of used disposable nappies!

Kate from Bouncing Sprouts:

Expensive & full of nasty chemicals.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

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October 12, 2012

Washing Nappies: Can You Wash Your Modern Cloth Nappies With Other Clothes?

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Washing Nappies: Can You Wash Your Modern Cloth Nappies with Other Clothes?

Discover if You Can Simply Chuck Cloth Nappies in With Your Regular Washing…

You may have images of washing cloth nappies as meaning all this extra washing, but no! Deal with the poo right from the start – into the loo and let’s find out what happens next… find what works for you based on the opinions of the experts, which do differ…

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Can I Wash My Modern Cloth Nappies With Other Clothes?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Yes.  Just pop the nappies in the machine first and give them a pre-wash to thoroughly rinse out any nasties.  Then add the rest of your clothes, half strength detergent and wash as usual.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

Yes you can, but you only need a little amount of washing powder as too much affect the absorbancy of nappies. I would recommend 1/3rd of what the box says (or less). Please choose powders/liquids that do not have bleach, enzymes, and do not use fabric softners either as this will affect the performance of the nappies also.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

Yup, I do it all the time 🙂

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

You can wash your nappies with other clothes, just run them through a rinse cycle first and then add the clothes, remember to use less detergent.  Personally I prefer not to do this too often as if washing with colours you nappies can take on a greyish colour.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

As long as the other clothes can be washed on the warm setting without the colour running (60°C is best) then it’s fine.  Remember to only use ¼ the amount of detergent.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

Yes you can, the only issue here is that if washing with loads that require heavy duty cleaning, you will often need to use the recommended amount of detergent, whereas if washing separately you can use less. This just means that detergent residue could build up quicker and you will have to strip wash more regularly.  

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

I do.

However, if the nappy has poo on it, I sometimes put the nappies through a quick rinse cycle before washing them with other things (just for hygienic reasons).

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

Yes you can! Simply do a machine rinse with just the nappies first (to remove most of the wee), then chuck in your clothing to make up a load when doing the full wash cycle.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

This is based on personal choice and how you normally wash your clothes.  If you do not have enough nappies for a full cycle, you can always add some clothes/towels after your nappies have gone through the prewash cycles. However, don’t forget that you must use less detergent to wash nappies than you would for clothes, as well as no other additives like whiteners/brighteners, enzymes, fragrances, softeners, vinegar and stain removing products. So do not add anything extra to your nappy cycle, you must wash your clothes with the detergent same as if they were nappies0 and not the other way around.

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

I would not recommend washing your cloth nappies with other clothes. MCN’s require only a very small amount of detergent to clean them. Using more than about 1/2 the recommended amount can cause detergent buildup on nappies making them smell and less absorbent. From a hygiene perspective, I’d also recommend to separate nappies from regular clothing and only washing nappies with other nappies, wet bags and reusable wipes.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

You can wash your nappies with your clothes. It is really a personal choice. Personally I would do a rinse cycle first on the nappies to remove most of the urine and other mess. The main issue is you are using less soap then recomended for your clothes. So you may want to consider what you are washing with your nappies, how dirty it is and how much soap you think it needs to come out nice and clean.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

October 1, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies: How Do You Know *When* To Change A Modern Cloth Nappy? How Often Do You Change Your Baby’s Modern Cloth Nappy?

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Australian Cloth Nappies. How Do You Know *When* To Change A Modern Cloth Nappy?

How Often Do You Change Your Baby’s Modern Cloth Nappy?

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Modern Cloth Nappy Newbie Help! How Do You Know When To Change A Modern Cloth Nappy? How Often Do You Change Your Baby’s Modern Cloth Nappy?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Cloth nappies actually tell you when to change them.They might start to smell wet after 3 hours, or feel heavy and full when you pat them. If they have cotton outside, they’ll actually start to wick moisture when the absorbent layers are soaked. This translates as a slight dampness around the legs – not wet enough to soil clothes or furniture, just a darkening of the fabric as a reminder that a change is overdue. If you add more boosters, you’ll get more time out of each nappy. I expect my Modern Cloth Nappies to last 3 hours at least, and adjust the absorbency to suit bub’s changing bladder size by adding a booster.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

Changing a Modern Cloth Nappy is no different to changing a disposable. You should change your nappy at least every 3 hours. With my newborn, I changed his nappy after every feed (if I remembered). There is no need to change more regularly than that unless your bub is a big wetter.

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

I found that once I got into the swing of using cloth nappies, it was easy to know how often to change my baby.  As with anything, it varies from baby to baby, and often from day to day.  You should always change your baby as soon as they poo, but how often you need to change a wet MCN will depend on how absorbent it is.  To begin with, if you change, or at least check your little one’s nappy every couple of hours during the day, you’ll soon get an idea of how often they need changing.  With a bit of extra padding, or boosting, most cloth nappies will last fine overnight, and won’t need changing unless they poo.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

Maximum every two hours.  Try to change it as soon as you know it’s wet/soiled, especially if your child is having trouble with rashes.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

I think it really depends on the bub but I prefer to change him when he is wet or after he poo’s of course! A newborn seems to feed, wee and sleep constantly, so as a newborn I change before naps, after naps and anytime in between. My 3 year old on the other hand needs changing less often as he pees less.

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

You should be changing your modern cloth nappy every 2-3 hours or when the nappy is wet. As with any nappy, as soon as your baby does a poo you should change it straight away.

Once your baby starts sleeping through the night, or at least not needing to be changed with each night feed you might need to consider a dedicated night nappy to last through night.

Putting a clean nappy on your baby before putting them down for a sleep means they are clean and dry and more likely to have a good sleep.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

There are lots of ways to know when its time for a change and you get better at recognising them with more exposure to nappies (its hard to know when to change a disposable at first too remember). Start off by getting hands on by often touching the nappy on bubs bum often (if its a minky nappy you won’t be able to stop yourself anyway!), give it a little squeeze around the crotch. It won’t take long for you to recognise the feel of a wet nappy! Another indicator is smell – if a number 2/poosplosion/poonami has occurred you will smell it just like you would in a disposable. I can also smell a wet nappy a mile off (disposables get a smell too, don’t worry, modern cloth nappies don’t smell!) And if all else fails and you aren’t feeling confident judging when its time, just change on about the 2-3 hour mark.

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Modern cloth nappies should be changed whenever they are wet or soiled (this also applies to disposables, although many people tend to leave them longer).  All babies are different but you very quickly learn to tell with your own baby.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

Generally around every 3 to 4 hours but it will change depending on what type of nappy you are using, how old your bub is and how much of a wetter your bub is.  You will get to know which nappies in your stash last a bit longer and which ones need to be changed more frequently.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Our Comment Question is about changing MCN:

Tell us how often you find you need to change your baby’s MCN?

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

September 17, 2012

Washing Nappies: Stains on Your Australian Cloth Nappies? Tips for Removing Nappy Stains…

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Washing Nappies: Stains on your Australian Cloth Nappies?

Discover How to remove Stains from Your Cloth Nappies With Ease, and Without Causing Damage.

Tips for removing stains from cloth nappies. It’s simple. Look outside. Nature has the way with these natural nappies every time!

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

How do you remove stains from modern cloth nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Sunlight will remove most of your discolouration, but sometimes it takes a few washes.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

The sun, sun, sun and I recommend to wash every day to two days maximum.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

My absolute fave tip for stain removal is SUNLIGHT – drying in the sunshine to bleach them and then a hand scrub with sunlight soap (AKA Velvet soap) for any stains that aren’t budging in the sunshine. I havent found a stain that sunlight or sunlight soap couldn’t handle 🙂

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

The best thing for removing stains from nappies is some time in the sunshine.  For extremely stubborn stains give them a scrub with sunlight/velvet soap.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

Simple warm wash (60°C is best) on a long cycle with an extra rinse at the end with only ¼ the amount of detergent.  Air dry outside in the sunshine as the UV acts as a natural bleach and steriliser.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

Hanging out in the sunlight will remove most stains. Some bi-carb in with your wash will help too (approx. 2tbsp).

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

If you have stains on your cloth nappies DO NOT USE STAIN REMOVER. Resist the urge. Put the spray down. Stain removers break down the fabrics in the nappy.

Trying washing more than once and then leave them on the clothes line in full sun. The sun will bleach most stains out of your nappies.

If that doesn’t work, try strip washing (which involves washing your clean, dry nappies in hot water (no more than 60 degrees) without any detergent. After the first wash, wash again with a very small amount of dishwashing detergent or shampoo (no more than a teaspoon) and then wash as many times as needed to remove all the bubbles from the water coming out of your washing machine.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

Lots of sunshine will fade and naturally bleach stains from nappies. But at the end of the day, if the nappy is washed and clean the stains are only cosmetic.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

We always recommend rinsing all soiled nappies asap before dry pailing, you should never leave solids to stick to the nappy for longer than it takes to get baby changed and safely away (be it cot, playpen, someone else etc.).  You should rinse the nappy either with a nappy sprayer attached to toilet, or tissue off excess then rinse away in the laundry sink. If stains and touching solids really worry you, liners are very good for a mess free and quick way of disposing solids.  Any stains still on the nappy after a full wash cycle should then be placed in the Sun for drying.  If it’s raining, just get your nappy out to the Sun as soon as you can.

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

The best treatment for stains is prevention.  EzyPeezies uses a charcoal bamboo lining, which being a dark grey colour is a lot more forgiving than white! We recommend washing your nappies every second day as leaving dirty nappies sitting for longer makes stains more likely and harder to remove. If you have a particularly messy nappy, rinse it out as soon as possible. In this case, I usually throw it straight into the washing machine with whatever is in the nappy bucket and run it through on a rinse cycle before adding to the nappy bucket. If you do get stains on your nappies, the best solution is the sun. If possible, lie nappies out flat in the direct sunlight, inside out. For stubbon stains, nappies may need an extra day or two to help fade them.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

Try and get nappies that use stain resistant fabrics like suede cloth. Rinse off any waste as soon as you change the nappy, if its still discoloured put it in a shallow bucket of water to soak whilst awaiting the wash. If you still have stains try and get the nappies out into the sunshine for some natural bleaching!

 

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

September 8, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies: 10 Helpful Resources


Win Australian Cloth Nappies

Looking For Australian Modern Cloth Nappies?

Check out the articles and resources about cloth nappies in Australia found here on My Green Nappy:

  1. Become a fan of the many cloth nappy shops on facebook for cloth nappy specials and nappy sales: Australian Modern Cloth Nappies on Facebook
  2. Here are 7 reasons why doing Elimination Communication with Australian Cloth Nappies is GREAT: Why Combine Modern Cloth Nappies With Elimination Communication?
  3. My first Press Release: My Green Nappy Announces Australian Cloth Nappies Giveaway Event To Promote Green Nappy Revolution
  4. Simple; Getting started part time with Cloth Nappies made in Australia: Australian Cloth Nappies. Need Some Advice And Help Getting Started With Modern Cloth Nappies? How To Start Part Time With A Mini Stash…
  5. My new opportunity to have more cloth nappy giveaways on My Green Nappy: Australian Cloth Nappy Giveaways: Let Us Help Promote Your Nappy!
  6. Australian Cloth Nappies Helping the World: Nappies on a Mission: Donate Your Used Cloth Nappies to Those in Need.
  7. Australian Cloth Nappy Shop Owners Recommend: What Do You Recommend As Your Favourite OSFM or OSFA Modern Cloth Nappy?
  8. Helping Mums with their Aussie Cloth Nappy Stash: Washing Nappies HELP! Tips for Washing My *Brand New* Australian Cloth Nappies?
  9. Modern Cloth Nappies last and last; a disposable is used but one and tossed away: Australian Cloth Nappies. How Long Do You Expect a Modern Cloth Nappy To Last?
  10. Helpful tips for washing your Aussie cloth nappies: Washing Modern Cloth Nappies: 3 Important Points when washing Australian Cloth Nappies…

 

My Green Nappy Thanks Our Current Sponsors; Who Offer You the Best Australian Cloth Nappies!

September 1, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies. Starting With Modern Cloth Nappies: How Old Was Your Bub When You Started Using Modern Cloth Nappies?

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Australian Cloth Nappies. How Old Was Your Bub When You Started Using Modern Cloth Nappies?

Let’s Find Out When the Experts Began Using Modern Cloth Nappies on their Babies – You May Be Surprised!

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

 Starting With Modern Cloth Nappies: How Old Was Your Bub When You Started Using Modern Cloth Nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

My third baby was in cloth as soon as I got her home from hospital. Her nappies fit from birth to toilet training. Some were hand-me-downs from her brother who’d just graduated to undies, others were brand new that I made specially for her.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

My youngest baby is 14 weeks and I started using cloth as soon as he was born. I only ventured into nighttime nappies when he was 12 weeks.

However, I must confess, I didn’t use cloth with my other 2 children. I am kicking myself for that now because I could have saved almost $6,000! I simply didn’t know they existed. Bummer.

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

I started using modern cloth nappies on my oldest child from when he was a few days old.  I’m glad I did because teeny tiny nappies are very cute, but really any age, is a good time to start.  Some people prefer to wait until they are settled into motherhood and all the changes it brings before making the switch to cloth, and that can be a great idea, as you don’t want to get too swamped with new things.  There’s no reason at all that you can’t start using cloth nappies from the very beginning though, as I did.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

My oldest was about 4 months old when I started sewing modern cloth nappies.  Prior to this we’d been using terry squares and changing about 20 a day!  My youngest was in modern cloth nappies from a couple of weeks old – I confess we started off with disposables to make the transition easier (and because I misjudged how many cloth nappies we’d need & how big he’d be!)

Susan from Nifty Naps:

My first bub was 6 weeks, my second it was when I came home from hospital.

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

Melanie – We used a combination of cloth and disposables for the first 6 weeks while we adjusted to life with a newborn. Beofe giving birth, I suspected that my son was going to be a big baby (at 9lb10oz I was right!!) so had avoided buying too many small sized nappies, and mostly had OSFM or mediums. At six weeks, we made the decision not to buy any more disposables and to just make do with the modern cloth nappies we had and a stack of terry flats until he grew into the mediums. This gave us a chance to experiment with different styles, and gave his little legs a chance to fatten up a bit and really didn’t take too long at all!

Diana – We started our son in cloth gradually when he was 4 months old. Once we started to build our collection we were so enthused and quite quickly we had a full stash and he was in cloth full time. We regret not doing it earlier because it was really much easier than we had anticipated and it was lovely to not have a do a mad dash to the shops when we ran out of disposables. If we have another baby they will not be in disposables at all. I am really looking forward to doing cloth from birth now that I know how great it is.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

My bub was almost 4mo. We bought imported OSFM nappies and then I gave birth to a 6pound 6 baby who just didn’t grow that big that fast! Her tiny thighs took a long time to fill the leg holes 🙂 Since then our stash has grown and evolved, I’ve got pockets, AIOs, AI2s, prefolds and covers. I know a lot more now than I did when I took the initial leap into cloth (I saw some nappies on ebay, thought they were cute and decided I wanted to be a cloth mumma! I didn’t know anyone who used modern cloth nappies or anything about them but I do now!!!) so when I have another baby it will be in cloth from the start.

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

My bub was 4 weeks old when I started using modern cloth nappies but I used terry squares on my older kids from birth.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

First time round my sons was three months old. It took time for me to get used to having a little person around however second time round my girl went straight into cloth nappies with confidence.  If you’re new to both having a little one and using cloth don’t put too much pressure on yourself to start using cloth straight away, full time.  Give yourself time to settle in with your baby and ask around for advice from other families already using cloth (mygreennappy is a great place to start). It is perfectly fine to introduce cloth nappies into your routine gradually.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Our Comment Question is about starting with Modern Cloth Nappies:

How old was your baby when you started using MCNS?

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

August 29, 2012

Modern Cloth Nappies: Cloth Nappy Shop Blog Roundup: August

Modern Cloth Nappies: Cloth Nappy Shop Blog Roundup: August

Many modern cloth nappy shops in Australia have a blog attached to or as part of their site.

The blog is a place where they share more details about the use and care of their nappies, about the particular styles, materials and products they have on offer and even about the day to day running of their business.

They may use their blog (or facebook page) to conduct market research on the types of fabrics to use in future nappies, to offer test nappies to develop new styles, refinements or generations of nappies.

Today’s post is a roundup of some of the recent blog posts I have found. Heaps of cloth nappy shops are very slow at using their blogs, as facebook is all the rage I guess… and yet, a blog is great for building traffic, as I know!

#1: at The Nappy Spot Natalie has an article about Cloth Nappying Challenges – a Lack of Water

What’s the greatest challenge that you’re facing at the moment? Trying to get a good fit on a newborn with skinny legs? Affording enough nappies to be able to use cloth full-time, or all day? Not enough sunshine to dry your nappies properly?

For me at the moment, it’s water! Or more specifically.. not enough of it. Our house runs on rainwater, for everything from drinking/cooking, showering, and of course, in the laundry. It’s been a dry winter, and there’s not too much left in the tanks, so I’ve had to cut back the length of my wash cycles, which is negatively affecting my MCN’s.. Read more @ The Nappy Spot…

#2: at One Less Disposable there is a post about Cheap and easy way to use prefolds:

Worried about the start-up costs of cloth nappying? Here is a cheapish solution to get you going.

A cheap way to go would be to use boosted prefolds and PUL covers. You would need to buy them online. Read more @ One Less Disposable…

#3: at Little Para Pants Blog, you’ll find a helpful post by Mel entitled Is it time to DIY?

If you’re on a budget, like sewing, or none of the MCNs you’ve tried have suited your child, you might decide to try making your own.

What you’ll need:

A sewing machine. It doesn’t have to be flash with all the bells & whistles, it just has to work. All you really need is a straight stitch and a zig-zag stitch.

Thread. Polyester thread works well, but don’t go for the stuff in the bargain bin. You’ll end up with a mess.

Needles. Again, don’t go for the cheap ones as they break way too easily. You’ll want the heaviest needles you can find (denim/jeans needles are good) for sewing through multiple layers of fabric. Read more @ Little Para Pants Blog

NB: Check out the new look over at Little Para Pants, where Mel specialises in custom made cloth swim nappies for children of all ages.

#4: at The Baby Chilli Nappies Blogspot, Rebecca has a post about The Great Downunder Nappy Hunt this September:

I am super excited about taking part in the Great Downunder Nappy Hunt this September 2012.All hunters will get a super 15% off everything on line! All you have to do is go towww.diaperdecisions.com and register to hunt in the great downunder nappy hunt.For all of you that don’t know what its about…. The Great Downunder nappy hunt is a scavanger hunt where you go to different websites in search of an icon. You follow fun clues and find some fabulous little websites along the way. Once you have found the icon you click on it and it brings you back to diaper decisions where it is marked as found. The more icons you find the more chance you have of winning some fabulous prizes!My contribution to the prize pool is a Safari party all in one nappy. Read more (and the Baby Chilli Prize) @ The Baby Chilli Nappies Blogspot

#5: at Pepper Place Blog you’ll find an article by Kelly titled: Can I use cloth nappies without a dryer?

YES.

Most definitely. Quite easily. In fact, take that dryer and list it on Freecycle right now, you don’t need it for anything!

(Sorry, letting my rabid greenie tendencies come through there. I’ll pull my head in)

But anyway, it is more than doable to use cloth without a dryer. It is the preferred method-the sun sanitises your nappies, the fresh air leaves them smelling great, and line-drying is free and non-polluting. I have never owned a dryer, nor lived in a house with one. Read more @ Pepper Place…

Visiting the blog of cloth nappy shops where you have purchased cloth nappies or are thinking of buying cloth nappies is a great way to get to know the owner and discover more about them and their nappies.

I hope you have enjoyed this round-up of cloth nappy blogs,

Charndra

P.S as always, I also like to give a little plug to My Green Nappy’s Sponsors:

August 28, 2012

Modern Cloth Nappies: Current Facebook Nappy Sale Offers in August

Modern Cloth Nappies: Current Facebook Nappy Sale Offers

Today’s is a short post to highlight a few of the most recent offers by Australian Modern Cloth Nappy Shops on facebook. Some are for sales, some for giveaways and contests.

Becoming a fan first of all of My Green Nappy is a great way to keep your eye on offers posted to my wall. I encourage any and all cloth nappy shops to post their specials and messages to my wall, and fans of my page use this as an opportunity to survey specials, giveaways and offers available online. There is a section where you can see all the recent posts of others.

Let’s have a look at several of the recent cloth nappy related offers:

#1: Sweet Pea Cloth Nappies. For a chance to win a Sweet Pea Cloth Nappies wet bag, become a fan of the page today. Once we get to 200 likers we’ll be giving away a wet bag.

#2: Baby Bare Cloth Nappies. Want to win a Baby Bare Nappy? Head over and enter our competition to name our new bright pink nappy!  It will be decided on Sunday night!

#3: Bummis Australia Love Bummis? Head on over to Bummis Australia and share the ‘like’ love to know first about specials, stock updates and tips & advice on cloth nappying!

#4: Apikali Modern Cloth Nappies Cloth Nappy Giveaway: only 25 likers to go. Help me support my daughter and to give away a premium cloth nappy.
www.apikali.com.au

#5: Rydees Australia. SALE! Buy 2 or more Rydees Australia nappies and get 5 Bamboo Terry Wipes for FREE! Until the end of August only..or unti stocks run out! These super soft double layered wipes are safe and gentle on little bums and are excellent for bubs who suffer from nappy rash as they contain no irritating chemicals or alcohol. These wipes are also extremely hardy and don’t loose that soft silky fluffiness wash after wash. If you dont use cloth wipes these make great washers and will be the first one in the pile you grab 🙂 Email Kylie to order at rydeesaustralia@hotmail.com.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this roundup of several facebook offers from Australian cloth nappy shops and can find the right bargain, discount, special or win for you!

Becoming a fan or ‘liker’ of the pages that appeal to you means that you can get their special offers directly to your news feed. This is also a great way to get to know the page owners, ask questions and have your finger on the pulse of current events and offers.

– Charndra

P.S … a little plug to My Green Nappy’s Sponsors:

August 21, 2012

ARE YOU A WASTE FREE PARENT? Workshops on Modern Cloth Nappies and Sustainable Living in New Zealand by The Nappy Lady…

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , — charndra @ 11:36 am

modern cloth nappies7 August 2012 News Release: The Nappy Lady

ARE YOU A WASTE FREE PARENT?

Modern cloth nappies are really taking off, and Kate Meads, the Nappy Lady, is taking her knowledge about cloth nappies and sustainable living to parents in 14 New Zealand towns during the next six months.

“Teaching parents about their options for minimising their impact on the environment is my passion, and councils and other organisations are really getting on board to support waste-free parenting as viable and achievable,” Kate explains.

In conjunction with various councils and with the support of many local cloth nappy companies, Kate is running informative workshops on waste-free parenting and modern cloth nappies in Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, Rotorua, Kawerau, Hastings, Palmerston North, New Plymouth, Hawera, Hutt City, Wellington, Dunedin, and Oamaru, and is set for a busy few months in the lead-up to summer.

” More and more councils around NZ are starting to look seriously at minimising the amount of waste they are accepting into their landfills,” Kate says. “Waste-free parenting is about not only minimising your family’s eco footprint, it’s also about teaching parents about sustainable and environmentally conscious options. Cloth nappies are one important component of this, but I also help parents to integrate other waste-minimising activities into their home life, such as composting and recycling.”

At The Nappy Lady workshops, parents and parents-to-be not only learn about the different styles of cloth nappies, they’ll also receive tips and information on what they can do at home to reduce their waste output. What’s more, attendees of the workshops receive a free cloth nappy trial pack to take home, giving them an opportunity to put into action the information they learn.

“There is massive interest in the workshops, and many are sold out weeks in advance,” Kate says. “Parents are hungry for this information and we’re adding more and more workshops to keep up with the demand. It’s great to see the initiative spreading nationwide, and the positive impact waste-free parenting and cloth nappies are having on Kiwi parents.”

modern cloth nappiesKate’s personal goal is to get every family in NZ with children in nappies to use just 1 cloth nappy per day which would prevent 1 million nappies from going into our local landfills every week.

All of the upcoming workshops are listed on The Nappy Lady’s website , or http://www.thenappylady.co.nz/workshops.asp

-ends-

For interviews, comments or more information, please contact, Kate Meads, The Nappy Lady on (07) 549 2955 or 027 22 11 242 or via email thenappylady@me.com

A full list of workshop dates are included:

Upcoming workshops:

AUCKLAND Saturday 18 August, 10:30am to 12pm
Saturday 25 August, 1:00pm to 2:30pm
Monday 17th September, 10am to 11:30am
Tuesday 18th September, 6pm to 7:30pm

HAMILTON Friday 5th October – 6pm – 8pm
ROTORUA Thursday 9 August – 6:30pm to 8:30pm
TAURANGA Saturday 11th August – 10am to 12 noon
Monday 19th November – 6:30pm – 8:30pm
HASTINGS Friday 24 August – 6:00pm to 8:00pm
NEW PLYMOUTH Thursday 6 September – 10:30am to 12:30pm
HAWERA Saturday 7 September – 10am to 12 noon
FEILDING Thursday 16th August – 6:30pm – 8:30pm
PALMERSTON NORTH Saturday 18 August – 10am to 12 noon
Wednesday 7th November 6:30pm – 8:30pm
DUNEDIN Saturday 29th September – 11:30am – 1:30pm

There are other nappy schemes that are in other areas that do not run a workshop.
Check the website (http://www.thenappylady.co.nz/workshops.asp) for more information and to book into any of the upcoming workshops.

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