My Green Nappy Discovering Modern Cloth Nappies and Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies

March 20, 2013

Washing Nappies: Getting Your Modern Cloth Nappies Dry – What You Must Know…

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Washing Nappies: Getting Your Modern Cloth Nappies Dry – What You Must Know.

Discover what the cloth nappy experts have to share about drying cloth nappies in Australia.

So, how do you dry cloth nappies? There are tips below based on the size of the nappy, the style of the nappy and where you might be living…

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

What MUST I know about drying my Australian cloth nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

The more your nappy deconstructs, the quicker it’ll dry.  So fast drying pocket nappies will get twice as much use as slow drying all in ones.  You can put your boosters in a dryer, and even the shells (on a cooler setting).  If you can, place your drying rack in front of the hot water system; the heat will speed up the drying process.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

The sun is your friend. If you need to dry your nappies in a hurry boosters can go in the dryer to speed up the process. Please do not place shells that contain PUL in the dryer as it may affect the performance over time.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

SUNSHINE!!! Also make sure you give the inserts the best chance to get dry when your hanging them out – take inserts out of nappies and peg them so the fabric isn’t folded over itself. When hanging your shells don’t stretch out the elastics as this will shorten their lifespan.

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Hang them either flat or sideways so as not to over stretch the elastic (this is especially important for AIO’s)  Pul can be dried in the dryer, on the lowest heat setting but it is probably not best to be drying them from scratch in the dryer every day.  Bamboo, microfibre and hemp can be dried more regularly and on a higher setting if needed.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

Air dry outside in the sunshine as the UV acts as a natural bleach and steriliser.   If it is raining outside then you can use a tumble dryer on the low heat setting.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

  1. Direct sunlight is best where possible;
  2. Next best thing is a clothes horse in a warm room;
  3. A quick tumble dry every now and then is OK, but the first two options are best for your nappies and the environment.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

The best method for drying your nappies is ‘Dry Pailing’. Dry Pailing is a fancy term for drying your nappies on the clothes line in the sun.

The sun is a great anti-bacterial agent, and what bacteria the washing machine doesn’t get out of your nappies, the sun will. The sun also bleaches the white inserts of your nappies, making them look like new everytime.

Some inserts can be tumble dried on a low heat, but tumble drying does not give you the same antibacterial effect that Dry Pailing does. Check each nappy for care instructions on drying. Most PUL fabrics must not be tumble dried (as they break down in the dryer) and most of the natural fabrics will eventually break down over time if they are continually tumble dried.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

Line dry in the sunshine for best results. If there is no sunshine, drying under the shade is still good as UV rays in the daytime are adequate. Otherwise a stint in a cool/warm dryer is also good, but make sure to handle the nappies gently to prevent warm elastic from overstretching.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

Our absolutely amazing (but harmful so slip slop slap) Sun, dries our nappies perfectly, stain free, bacteria free, sun dried fresh smell and oh so quickly!! But what do we do in winter, when it’s wet or cloudy, well we should still make the most of the Sun when she’s out, so use those mobile airers, we personally love them.  We follow the Sun around as much as we can with our mobile airers or if there’s no Sun put your nappies near the heater.  With babies and our chilly weather, surely you will have some form of heating device on at times.  So ditch the clothes dryer and just plonk your mobile airer next to your choice of heat.

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

EzyPeezies are very quick to dry as they are pocket nappies and you can remove the bamboo inserts for washing and drying.

Contrary to popular opinion, I am not a fan of drying nappies regularly in direct sunlight. This can fade the colour of nappies, and decrease the life of the outer fabric and elastics. Occasionly, for stubbon stains the sun is a great help in fading these, but not for regular use.

I prefer to line dry nappies in the shade, hanging horizontally to protect the leg elastics, or dry in the tumble dryer on a low heat setting if its wet or i am running out of time! Never dry on a hot heat setting as this can damage the plastic snaps and ‘delaminate’ the PUL waterproof outer layer.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

Make sure they are dry. If they are not they will be less absorbant, gather a smell about them and probably be less comfy on baby. I use a dryer on my inserts as I find it helps get the last moisture out of them. I find the covers where the elastic and waterproofing are dry quickly. These shouldn’t go in the dryer as it can destroy the waterproof coatings and erode the elastics.

 

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

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February 25, 2013

Meet Our Guest: Destination Green

Let’s Meet Emma, the proud owner of Destination Green:

Hi, my name is Emma and I’m from Sydney. I started my career as a waste educator and currently work as an environmental scientist. I am definitely a “greenie” at heart and initially loved the idea that i could help minimise my first born daughters carbon footprint by using cloth nappies. Seeing how easy it was we are continuing to use them on our second! Just to take it that one step further we started Destination Green to get more people using them!

About Destination Green:

My husband and I own “Destination Green”. It seems all the nappy shops/brands have cute and fluffy names but we came up with the name Destination Green as we want to grow over time to become more than just nappies. We want to become the go-to shop for all things sustainable especially for those on a budget.

Destination Green sells pocket one size fits most nappies, we also have newborn/premmie nappies, with bamboo and double gusset nappies coming soon. We have loads of nappy accessories including some great wet bags and bamboo training pants.

We offer all our facebook fans/likers a FREE gift with their first purchase, and we are always having other specials.

As an environmental scientist i have concerns about all aspects of the environment especially with regard to climate change. Anything we can do to minimise our impact on the environment and help others do the same by making sustainable purchases for our children will help, remembering “every little bit counts”.

When you visit Destination Green make sure you have a look at:

  1. Our Shop – all our cute designer nappies at affordable prices.
  2. Nappy Debate – get real life calculations on how much you can save by using modern cloth nappies.
  3. Blog – It’s not just about bums! It’s about giving you ideas on how to embed sustainability into your children’s life.

Here are three of my favourite sites:

  1. Nappies on a mission – if you no longer need your cloth nappies consider donating them to orphanages through nappies on a mission.
  2. An amazing mum entrepreneur network
  3. Amazing pre-natal, post-natal pilates and massage

Question for readers: How did you convince your partners to go on the cloth nappy journey with you?

Meet Our Guests...Meet Our Guests
– This is a regular feature of My Green Nappy in which family friendly sites are invited to contribute a post about their website. You’ll discover a bit about their ideas, specialties, what motivated their passion and what concerns them about the environment at the moment.
Find out more about contributing a guest post…

Pop over to support My Green Nappy’s Awesome Sponsors:
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February 20, 2013

Cloth Nappy Washing – My Top Tip For Cleaner Cloth Nappies…

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Cloth Nappy Washing – My Top Tip

Discover What the Experts Offer as their most Important Cloth Nappy Washing Tip – To Make Nappy Cleaning Simpler And Easier For YOU!

This article offers you ONE tip top cloth nappy washing tip from each of our nappy experts. Learn from those who love these nappies: they’ll have all the best tips for you…

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below or on facebook.

Let’s see what they have to say:

What is your top tip to Mums about washing their cloth nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

I have a home-made water trigger gun in the toilet, for spraying off solids. Best trick ever though, was to take bub to the toilet every time she grunted or got that glazed look.  I take off her nappy above the toilet (if she’s already pooed it’ll fall into the bowl), then I sit her on the loo, hold her hands and she does her business.  She only pees in her nappies, which makes cloth nappying super easy for me.

(Lara is of course talking about Elimination Communication: You can get a free eBook about how to get started here, or a $2.99 eBook here…)

Susan from Nifty Naps:

Bio degradable liners!

Kate from Bouncing Sprouts:

Don’t be scared to only use about ¼ the amount of detergent you would normally.  Our thumb of rule is ‘less is more’, less detergent = more absorbency.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

If my nappies are getting a bit smelly and I don’t have time to do a strip wash, I just add 2tbsp of bi-carb soda to the wash with my laundry detergent and this keeps them going a little bit longer.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

One trick I love is placing a cotton bud dipped in Eucalyptus Oil stuck to the bottom of the nappy bucket lid with masking tape. It makes the bucket smell so lovely and freshens up my laundry.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

I can’t be without my nappy sprayer! Not only useful in rinsing out soiled nappies, but also good to rinse inserts with teething wee, and to clean up little toilet-training botts.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

Liners! Forget sprayers, scrapers, stain removers; liners will help make removing solids a fast, easy and mess free job!

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

Wherever possible reduce the amount of time nappies spend dirty! I was doing everything ‘by the book’ in washing my nappies but still finding that they had a lingering smell. Since changing to washing every second day at most, this has gone. I recommend leaving nappies dirty no longer than 48hours and if a nappy is particularly messy (and we all know what they are!) rinse as you normally would, then before putting the nappy in the nappy bucket, pop in the machine with the contents of the nappy bucket and run through on a plain rinse cycle. Once done, you can put the load back into the nappy bucket until you have your usual amount to wash, but I found that this really helped with smells, stains and just generally making the nappies feel cleaner.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

Use a clothes horse. Its easier to hang the nappies on. You can hang them the night before and quickly pop them out in the sun in the morning before work or the mayhem of having children starts again! You can bring them in and leave them hanging overnight. If I had to use the washing line I’d be less keen on cloth nappies.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

Buy sunlight soap, its cheap and it works so well! If your nappy still has a stain after a day in the sun wet it, scrub it with sunlight soap, rub the fabric against itself to really get some friction happening, rinse. If its still visible, repeat. I LOVE it!

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Definitely my nappy sprayer is the thing that makes cloth nappying so much easier.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Pop over to My Green Nappy’s Awesome Sponsors:

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February 3, 2013

Bouncing Sprouts: the exclusive Australian supplier of Baba+Boo Nappies from the UK. (Press Release 2013)

Founded in early 2012, Bouncing Sprouts® is the exclusive Australian supplier of award winning, UK
branded nappies and accessories Baba+Boo®.

Late last year, Baba+Boo® launched the exclusive “Enchanted Forrest and Vintage Toys” range of nappies, wet bags and fashion accessories. The new collections join Baba+Boo’s classic collections – mini beasts, animal kingdom, pirates and princesses.

The award winning nappies have been designed by Eve Bell, the founder of Baba+Boo® and each nappy tested by independent sources and customers. The newest exclusive fabrics, which include Master Frog, Little Miss Rabbit, Mr Fox, Miss Hedgehog, Robots and Russian Dolls are one of a kind, meaning you won’t find them anywhere else in the entire world!

Each Baba+Boo® nappy is made under strict ethical conditions comes with the Oeko-Tex® standard, guaranteeing it free of any nasty or harmful chemicals and to top it off, money back guarantee.

Baba+Boo® nappies are designed to fit babies from ~3.5kg all the way through to potty training. The popper system grows with the baby so they can fit right from newborn up to being 3 years old. Our nappies come with 2 large microfiber inserts, which also have poppers so you can make them smaller for newborn tots.

Each nappy is made from a beautiful soft or minky PUL with a waterproof layer to keep the wetness inside. These nappies have matching snaps which make them look truly stunning.

Each nappy comes with informative usage and care instructions but we are only a call or email away, please contact us with any questions, we are always on hand to help any parent decide if cloth is for them…

I look forward to getting to know you,

Kate
Founder, Bouncing Sprouts
www.BouncingSprouts.com
www.facebook.com/BouncingSprouts
Email: kate@bouncingsprouts.com 

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January 24, 2013

Meet Our Guest: Pepper Place – Modern Cloth Nappies and more!

Let’s Meet Kelly from Pepper Place:

Hi! My name is Kelly and I live in Tasmania (currently…..we move quite a bit!). I have a husband and five kids between 8 and 3. That’s their ages, not the only time in the day that I have them-so life is busy, but that’s just the way I like it. Something about me? I’m always experimenting with things. I always need a challenge, either in my hobbies (sewing, crochet, gardening, cooking) to our lifestyle (like living off-grid recently for 18 months, then travelling in a tent for nine months). The current (and long-term ongoing) project is increasing the amount of food we produce ourselves-recently adding meat, an interesting learning curve for former vegetarians.

About Pepper Place…

– My specialty is one-size nappies. I had my kids close, and had three kids in full-time nappies for a long time. I noticed there really wasn’t much difference in nappy sizes, and they all seemed to fit for much longer than the size recommendations, so after making sized fitteds to sell for a year or so I decided one-size was the way to go. Lots of others seem to share my view!
I give discounts for people with a Carers Card. Kids with special needs usually need to spend longer in nappies-my son with special needs was in day nappies until 3 and continues to wear a night nappy at 6. When you need so much more every saving counts.
– I’ve recently started selling tie-dyed kids clothes after turning my kids into rainbows for the past four years-although there’s not many pictures up yet, they’ll keep coming as I love doing it.

Our Planet Matters!

Oh dear, I’m a rampant greenie, where do I start?! If I had to pick just one thing to stop, it would be our silly, greedy use of resources. We’re gobbling up all of our non-renewable resources at a truly mind-boggling rate, mostly on silly things that we don’t need that don’t improve our quality of life -and very few people are planning for what we’re all going to do when it starts to run out.

When you visit Pepper Place, make sure you have a look at:

1. My tutorials, I love encouraging DIY-so much so that i’m releasing my patterns for home and licensed use in early 2013.
2. My product information – everything explained.

3 of my favourite sites are:

1. Eden Seeds – as a keen gardener this is my favourite site to make orders from.
2. Milkwood Permaculture – I love what these guys do! From rocket stoves to inground aquaponics, there’s always something to get me thinking.
3. Auslan Signbank – with a partially deaf child Auslan was our natural choice for our home education second language…….and it’s so much fun!

A question from Kelly:

One-sized nappies or multi-sized nappies-what’s your preference and why?

Meet Our Guests...Meet Our Guests
– This is a regular feature of My Green Nappy in which family friendly sites are invited to contribute a post about their website. You’ll discover a bit about their ideas, specialties, what motivated their passion and what concerns them about the environment at the moment.
Find out more about contributing a guest post…

Pop over to support My Green Nappy’s Awesome Sponsors:
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January 20, 2013

Washing Cloth Nappies: What the Experts Do To Wash Their Cloth Nappies…

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Washing Cloth Nappies: What the Experts Do To Wash Their Cloth Nappies…

Learn From the Nappy Routine of Mums Who Sell Modern Cloth Nappies! 

In this article I asked the experts – What is YOUR washing routine? Discover what they do, and perhaps find a new tip to help out with your own nappy cleaning routine.

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

What is YOUR washing routine? 

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

I put my nappies in a cold rinse cycle. Then I do a hot wash with a small amount of eco-friendly detergent.  I dry them on them on the line.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

I clean up all solids in the toilet by using a biodegradable liner which is easy to flush. I also have a hose connected to the toilet that I like to use to give my nappies a quick rinse before I dry pail. I wash every one to two days. I first do a quick eco rinse on cold. I then do a normal wash on cold. I then hang on a clothes airer outside. I only peg the wipes and some boosters, the shells lay flat with inners up to the sun. Easy!

Kate from Bouncing Sprouts:

• Dry pail nappies – no soaking, no scrubbing.
• Wash every day or every 2nd day.
• Cold machine prerinse.
• Warm wash (60°C is best) with ¼ the amount of detergent you would normally use.
• Extra rinse at the end to ensure all soap suds have disappeared.
• Air dry outside in the sunshine

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

  1. Dry pail until I have enough for a load;
  2. Wash in cold water using Earth brand laundry detergent at half the recommended amount
  3. Hang in the sun to dry (when I can, this sometimes hard, especially in winter, in which case I make the most of every sunny day! When it’s horrible outside I hang on a clothes horse near the fire.
  4. I always hang my nappies sideways, pegging from front to back.
  5. I will occasionally put them in the dryer if I am desperate but try to do this sparingly as it is harder on the nappies and shortens their life span.

When I notice they are starting to not be so absorbent / getting smelly I do a stripwash as follows (approx. every 1-2 months):

  1. Cold wash as above;
  2. Put through a few rinse cycles until there are no more soap suds in the water
  3. Do another wash with 2tbsp bi-carb soda instead of laundry detergent, with the water as hot as it will go. A lot of people say to add some vinegar in the rinse cycle here, though I only do this if washing nappies without PUL i.e. fitteds. If they have PUL, vinegar can affect it.
  4. Hang out to dry (preferably in the sunlight).

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

I have enough nappies in my stash to avoid washing every 3 days. In fact, I have so many I could wash weekly if I wanted (sorry – I don’t mean to make you jealous)! However, despite this, I make sure I wash at least every 2 – 3 days.

I personally wash all my nappies with my other clothes. Some people don’t like to do this, but I have no troubles with it.

I always dry my nappies on the line (never in the dryer). If it is not sunny enough to dry my nappies, I don’t wash them. I use a biodegradable insert with my Hybrid nappies!

I personally use GroVia Tiny Bubbles as a washing powder for all my clothes (not only my nappies) because of its gentle nature and lack of fillers.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

1. Remove solid waste into the toilet using a Diaper Sprayer and Drypail
2. Do a cold machine rinse with nappies only.
3. Do a full machine wash cycle on 40ºC with cloth nappy friendly detergent like ecoStore laundry powder, Rockin Green Detergent or Charlie’s Soap. I add on baby’s clothing at this stage.
4. Line dry is best to sanitise the nappy and remove stains. Or if it is rainy I dry on a clothes airer or clothes dryer.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

I personally do not mind the hands on approach, I know with modern cloth nappies the sell is time saving, less work, straight into the washing machine, yadda yadda yadda, I know, I sell them! But personally,  I like my nappies clean before I put them in the washing machine, I know I know, but that’s just me! I honestly find it so easy to just quickly rinse each nappy under a running tap with the help of a washboard. I am pleased to say, I have actually never, ever needed to strip wash my nappies, neither for smell or absorbency problems.

So this is what I do:

  • Remove any solids into the toilet
  • Adorn with fancy $1 rubber gloves from Aldi (love them)
  • Rinse nappy under running hot water and agitate quickly with washboard, especially if there is a stain, this method removes all stains straight away
  • Wring out water and dry pail
  • Load washing machine when I have a full load, use ¼ scoop detergent
  • Dry on mobile airer under Sun or indoors if raining and next to heater in winter

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

To wash my nappies:

  1. Shake or scrape any excess solids into toilet and give nappy a quick rinse. Plain wet nappies can go straight into the nappy bucket.
  2. Remove inserts from pocket and pop nappy and inserts into a nappy bucket with a tight fitting lid. No water is required.
  3. Every second day (religiously!), empty the contents of the nappy bucket into the washing machine.
  4. Run machine on a rinse cycle in plain cold water with no detergent.
  5. Add 1tbs of Planet Arc ‘Aware’ sensitive laundry detergent and 1/4c Detol Sanitary laundry rinse to fabric softer dispenser.
  6. If possible, line dry outside, always hanging horizontally to protect leg elastics, or if its wet or I am running out of time, dry in the tumble dryer on a ‘delicate’ or very low heat setting.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

I wash once my nappy bucket is full (so Im not washing too many or too few nappies). This is about 2 days worth of nappies. I wash with half the recommended plant derived detergent. I use a front loader and put them through a full cycle on cold, with a fast spin and do a rinse at the end.

I hang my nappies on a clothes horse as I find this to make life easy. I pop the nappies out in the sun and then if they are not quite dry I bring them in overnight to stay on the clothes horse. I can move the clothes horse in front of a heater in winter to get a bit more drying done. I usually throw the inserts in the dryer for 10 or so minutes to finish them off and ensure all the wetness is gone if in doubt!

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

Put wet nappies into a dry nappy bucket (I pull the inserts out at this point if I’ve got a spare hand!), use my little squirt to rinse off any poo before putting nappies in the dry bucket too, leave the lid off (we store ours in the toilet and it doesn’t smell I promise.). Every day or so I wash the nappies, put them in machine, warm water pre-rinse, empty the machine then put it on for a regular cycle (sometimes use heavy duty when the teething toxic wees are about!) with a bag of soap nuts in place of detergent. Hang out to dry in the sunshine and bring them in when they are dried. Put the nappies together while watching TV at night 🙂

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

I rinse any solids into the toilet and dry pail.  Then each evening I run them through a rinse cycle then a regular wash with about half as much detergent as I would for a normal wash.  I use either Rockin Green or Eco Store Powder.  Then hang them on the line outside where they will get as much as sun as the weather will allow. If they are not quite dry I hang the shells inside and throw the inserts through the dryer until dry.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Pop over to My Green Nappy’s Awesome Sponsors:

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December 20, 2012

Washing Cloth Nappies: Removing Smells From Your Cloth Nappies.

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Washing Cloth Nappies: Removing Smells From Your Cloth Nappies.

Discover what to do if, despite your careful washing routine, you get a build up of smells in your cloth nappies. What should you do with smelly cloth nappies?

Smells are a big red flag when you mention cloth nappies to people, but with simple strategies to follow given below, you can manage fresh smelling nappies every time!

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

How do I remove smells from my cloth nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Every now and then, do a strip wash to remove any soap residue and minerals.  Alternatively, you can add a few drops of ti tree oil to the wash – that helps.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

If your nappies start to smell it may be a build up of washing powder in the nappies as too much powder may trap the smell in. You can strip wash with a little bit of dish washing liquid (10cent piece worth for a full load) and rinse until the water is clear of suds and then sun sun sun and they will be smell free.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

Pre-rinse in the machine, leave the lid off the nappy bucket at all times (let them get some air, lid on just makes the wee smell grow – eww!) and sunshine! If they are still smelly then try out a strip wash by either doing multiple washes with no detergent in warm-hot water or giving the nappies a wash cycle with a cheap, basic dish washing liquid and lots of rinses to get all the detergent out of the nappies (detergent build up loves to hold onto smell!)

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

If your nappies are getting smelly there is a chance that they have a build up of detergent.  To remove this you need to do a strip wash which involves doing your regular pre rinse then wash your nappies at 40-60 degrees with a squirt of dish detergent.  Then just run them through another rinse cycle (or more than one if you are still getting bubbles). Sunshine will also help with smells.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

Perform a strip which eliminates smells and detergent build up.  There are several ways to do this but this method works best for us.

  1.  Start with clean nappies, ensure they are washed before starting your strip wash.
  2. Add 1/3 cup of bicarbonate soda to the wash (front loaders) or a dish-washing tablet (top-loaders) and wash on a long (2-2.5hr) warm (60°C is best) wash.
  3. Run a rinse cycle to ensure all the soap suds have disappeared.  You might need to repeat the rinse cycle 2-3 times.
  4. Air dry outside in the sunshine as the UV acts as a natural bleach and steriliser.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

Again sunlight is the best medicine, though over time (every month or so, sometimes more, sometimes less) you will need to do a strip wash.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

If your nappies get a bit smelly you could have a build up of ammonia.

When this happens, you may need to strip wash your nappies. This involves washing your clean, dry nappies in hot water (no more than 60 degrees) without any detergent. After the first wash, wash again with a very small amount of dishwashing detergent or shampoo (no more than a teaspoon) and then wash as many times as needed to remove all the bubbles from the water coming out of your washing machine.

We do not recommend that you strip wash more frequently than every six months.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

If you get smells:
– Soak clean nappies in plain water from time to time.
– If you use a lot of microfibre, squeeze them out in plain water to help remove detergent buildup.
– Occasionally, use a small amount of Canestan wash or similar anti-bacterial/anti-fungal wash and make sure it is rinsed out.
– Use products like Rockin Green Detergent Funk Rock as occasional nappy soakers to get the smells out.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

Adding a couple drops of tea tree, eucalyptus or lavender oil will help with the smell of your nappies.  If you’ve notice that recently, your nappies smell more than usual, it could mean you’re due for a strip wash.  In the case of strip washing, you could try adding bicarb or vinegar to your cycle (for strip wash only).  You could also try soaking clean nappies (nappies straight out of the wash) in a small squirt of non-moisturising dishwashing liquid and hot water overnight.  Next morning, drain the nappies and put them through as many rinse cycles (in your washing machine) as it takes to produce suds free water.  Strip washing will not only help with the smell of your nappies, but also improve the absorbency as well.

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

Prevention is always better than solution! The best prevention to is wash frequently. I recommend not leaving dirty nappies in the nappy bucket any longer than 48hours. Detergent buildup also contributes to smelly nappies. To prevent detergent buildup only add small amount of detergent (around 1/4 to 1/2 of the recommended amount). Not allowing nappies and inserts to fully dry prior to use also can contribute to smells.

If your nappies are smelly the first thing to do is try and determine the cause. If you think its leaving them too long before washing, try washing every second day. If you find it hard to remember to do this, reduce the size of your nappy bucket or bag so it only just fits 1 -2 days worth of nappies at most, and wash as soon as it is full.

If you think it may be detergent buildup that is causing smells, you can do a strip wash to help remove the excess detergent, then continue to wash your nappies with a reduced amount of detergent. To strip wash your nappies, wash them on a long, hot wash cycle with no detergent. this may need to be repeated if there is a lot of detergent.

I have also found Detol Sanitary Laundry Rinse fantastic to help reduce smells in my nappy wash. Just add about 1/8 cup to the fabric softer dispenser in your washing machine.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

Nappies often get a awful odour to them which is hard to get rid of. Make sure your nappies are drying properly between each use. The smell can be a dank smell from not drying. Also try and get them to dry as quickly as possible. I often put my nappies in the sun and finish the inserts off in the dryer for ten minutes (I dont put the nappy outers in to avoid the heat destroying the waterproof coating of the nappy) to make sure they are dry and dried quickly!

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

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December 1, 2012

Switching From Disposable To Cloth? Tips To Make The Switch to Australian Cloth Nappies as Easy as Pie!

WIN a modern cloth nappy – Join our Giveaways List

Switching From Disposable To The Modern Cloth Nappy?

Tips To Make The Switch to Australian Cloth Nappies as Easy as Pie!

By using any of the many Australian cloth nappies available, you will find the right one for your baby’s needs. When making the switch from disposables to modern cloth nappies (as the vast majority of mums do change from disposables to cloth nappies rather than start out using cloth nappies), there are tips from those more experienced which can make the change much easier, so let’s read on and discover the best tips for changing to reusable nappies…

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Switching From Disposable To Cloth? Tips To Make The Switch to the Modern Cloth Nappy as Easy as Pie! 

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

My one tip is try before you buy in bulk.  Don’t get roped into buying 24 of one brand unless you are 100% certain that the particular brand is the only brand you want to use.  Buy a selection of nappies and find out what works for you (because after all, you are the one that is going to have to use these nappies everyday).

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

Start off with one or two nappies, and take it from there. Try borrowing them from a hire scheme or friend, or if that’s not available, getting some second hand ones to try and find out what works best for you and your baby.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

If your partner is reluctant to use cloth, start with some all-in-one nappies and flushable liners.  This way it’s just as easy as changing a disposable, with the added bonus of being able to flush away any poo!

Susan from Nifty Naps:

Bio degradable liners and a hose connected to your toilet. They make Modern Cloth Nappies even easier!

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

Be prepared! Ensure you have a stash of nappies that have been washed and dried at least once. Have an empty bucket ready to store those dirty nappies at home and look at getting a wetbag for when out and about. Have realistic expectations and be experimental as you try different types of nappies.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

Have your nappies all put together and ready to put on just like a disposable is (or use AIOs to make it even easier!)

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Don’t give up at the first hiccup, like all aspects of parenting, cloth nappying takes a little bit of time to master, with a little bit of persistence you can make a huge difference to the planet and to your hip pocket too!

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

Seek advice from a nappy consultant or advocate such as ourselves to help you select a nappy stash that will suit your family needs, whether it is ease of use, drying time or sticking to a budget.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Modern Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Our Comment Question is about the Modern Cloth Nappy:

If you’ve chosen them, tell us why?

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Pop over to My Green Nappy’s Awesome Sponsors:

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November 20, 2012

Washing Cloth Nappies: What NOT to do!

Washing Cloth Nappies: What NOT to do!

How do You RUIN Your Cloth Nappies Fast? Find Out What NOT to Do When Cleaning Australian Cloth Nappies…

Washing cloth nappies should be easy. You can only ruin them by paying no attention to their care instructions, repeatedly. Let our experts remind you of the no-no’s, so your cloth nappies last for years and years!

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

What show I definitely NOT do when washing my cloth nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Don’t use fabric softener!  Don’t soak nappies if they’re meant to be dry-pailed.  Don’t use nappy soaker solution. Don’t use pure soak flakes. Don’t use liquids.  Don’t use anything with built in bleaches, brighteners, softeners etc.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

Do not use bleach, enzymes, fabric softners and no soaking 🙂

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

Don’t use too much detergent, it will just create a barrier on the fabric and your perfectly good nappies will be leaking left right and centre! Don’t soak and avoid napisan at all costs!

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Do not soak your nappies in soakers or bleach.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

  • If your baby does have nappy rash that usually rears its ugly head when your baby is teething, don’t use a barrier cream with these nappies. It will leave a greasy residue which is difficult to remove. If you need to use any cream, make sure you use disposable nappy liners.
  • Do not use fabric softener as it can coat the fabrics making them water-repellent and can cause leaks. The fabrics do not require any softener.
  • Do not use bleach on the nappies.
  • Do not iron.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

  1. Do not store soiled/wet nappies for more than two days before washing.
  2. Do not soak.
  3. Do not bleach.
  4. Do not use fabric softeners as this can coat the fabric affecting absorbency.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

So you have heard what you have to do to wash your cute little bundles of fluff, but if you want your nappies to last DO NOT:

  • Wash on a hot wash that is hotter than 60 degrees.
  • Soak nappies in water or any detergent (other than soaking them before their first use).
  • Use fabric softener, vinegar, bleach or napisan. It will clog up the fibres of the nappy.
  • Tumble dry any PUL fabric. It will melt it!
  • Hang nappies from the line in a way that will stretch the elastic (i.e. with soakers hanging down and pulling the nappy out flat). You should have the heavy part of the nappy on the line with the lighter part hanging down.
  • Use too much detergent or use detergent with fillers. Again, that will clog up the fibres of the nappy. Use the same amount of detergent you would normally use for the load you are washing. You can use nappy detergent that is specifically designed for cleaning nappies but it is not absolutely necessary. Many good retailers sell this detergent. I personally use GroVia’s Tiny Bubbles.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

DO NOT use a hot wash or dryer all the time – your nappies will wear out faster.
DO NOT use any chlorine bleach, nappisan or any detergent that has enzymes.
DO NOT leave a dry bucket full of dirty nappies for more than 2 days.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

  • Don’t soak your nappies in stain removers/Napisan, with modern cloth nappies, dry pailing is the preferred method as soaking nappies poses a safety hazard for babies and is unnecessary for materials like bamboo.
  • Don’t wash any nappies with PUL in very hot water, ie over 60 degrees, as it will break down the PUL and elastics and shorten nappy lifespan.
  • Don’t use softeners unless you want a leaky baby, as they coat the fibres causing them to be less absorbent.
  • Don’t use bleach on your nappies ever, unless you are using traditional cotton squares etc.
  • Don’t use vinegar as part of your standard washing cycles as they break down the PUL and elastics (once again, unless you’re using traditional cloth nappies)
  • Don’t overload your machine; if your nappies are coming out smelling a little much, then you should try putting less in. Generally we recommend maximum 2 of our complete nappies (incl boosters) per kg capacity of your washing machine.

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

There are a few things which are very detrimental to washing cloth nappies.

  1. Soaking in solutions such as nappy san. This are unnecessary with MCN’s and can cause detergent buildup and break down the water proof outer layer and elastics, reducing the life span of your nappies
  2. Adding fabric softners or other laundry additives, again, these are unnecessary and can coat the fibres making the nappies less absorbant and smell.
  3. Washing regularly on hot heat (above 60 degrees celcuis) as this can cause deteriation of the waterproof outer layer and elastics.
  4. Drying in dryer on high heat. Again, this can cause deterioration of the outer waterproof layer, elastics and damage the plastic snaps.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

  1. Do not soak them in napisan or other soakers.
  2. Do not leave them sitting in a bucket for a long period of time. Urine is strong and will eat into the elastic in your  nappies reducing their life span.
  3. Don’t put them in the dryer on ‘HOT’ only use a cool setting if you need to use the dryer.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Pop over to My Green Nappy’s Awesome Sponsors:

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November 1, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies: Help! Don’t Know Where To Start? How About The Mini Stash…

WIN a modern cloth nappy – Join our Giveaways List

Australian Cloth Nappies: Help! Don’t Know Where To Start? How About The Mini Stash…

How Part Time Cloth Nappies Saves Money and is an Easy Way to Convert From Disposables to the Modern Cloth Nappy…

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below, or on facebook.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Modern Cloth Nappy Newbie Help! Don’t Know Where To Start? How About The Mini Stash… 

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

If you don’t know where to start…try one of everything! Cloth nappies work differently for different babies and you have to buy what suits you (not what has the highest rating score or what your sister bought). The only way you will find out what suits you is by trying one of each type of nappy.

If you are not sure what you need, we recommend that you purchase a package that has at least one of the following:

  • a pocket nappy. Try Green Kids’ Anytimes nappies.
  • a fitted nappy. Try Itti Bitti D’Lish.
  • a one size nappy. Try Cushie Tushies, Grovia Hybrid, Bitti Tutto or Ones&Twos.
  • an all in one (AIO) nappy. Try Tots Bots Easyfit or the GroVia AIO;
  • a snap in one (SIO) nappy. Try the GroVia Hybrid.

You might also want to purchase a wet bag for storing nappies when you are out and about.
See our “New to Cloth – One of Everything” pack in our Nappy Packages section of our website). Our pack has one of each of the above types of nappies in it. We have selected the best selling nappies from each category to take the guess work out of it for our customers.

Buying a pack from a retailer (rather than the manufacturer directly) is the best way to go as you will save on postage because you can buy all the nappies in one spot. A retailer will also be able to provide you with unbiased opinions on what works for them and what sells best so having a chat to a retailer is also a good idea.

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Just get 3 or 5 to start with, so you can use them all in one day, wash them that night, and they’re ready again tomorrow (go for quick to dry nappies, like pockets).  You’ll get a good idea quicker if you have a full day in cloth.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

If you’re new to cloth nappies, then a mini stash is a great way to start.  It gives you chance to build up your collection slowly, finding out what works for you and your baby, and means that you aren’t spending a lot of money all at once.  Try out a few different styles and brands, maybe buying second hand to begin with, until you find what really works for you.  Try using the nappies at home to begin with, and then build up to using them full time over time.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

When my last baby was born we started out with disposables.  After a week or two, I started using MCN just at home, during the day.  When I ran out of the cloth nappies, I’d use disposables again until the cloth nappies were washed & dry.  Slowly over time I was able to find enough time to sew more nappies till we had a big enough stash to switch over completely.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

If you want easy I would go for an AI1 (all in one) or an AI2 (all in two)  – that way you change the whole system when it comes to changing. Then you can move onto the other types out there once you are more aware of whats available.

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

A mini stash is a great way to begin using cloth!

Start by choosing a few different styles of nappies you think you’d be interested in using, trial packs are a great option for this. Once you have compiled a small stash of 6-8 nappies and given them a couple of pre-washes, allocate one day in your week to be a Cloth Day. 6-8 nappies should be enough for the day, and then you can wash that night.

If you don’t feel like 8 nappies is enough for a whole load of washing, give the nappies a good rinse and throw them in with your other washing, avoid using fabric softeners. You might like to continue doing this for a little while until you feel comfortable using cloth full time, or you may just want to use cloth when at home.

Once you have more experience using the nappies you have, you are able to confidently add more nappies to your stash using the styles & systems you prefer.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

If switching to cloth a ‘mini stash’ is a great way to trial a few nappies styles to see which one you find yourself impatiently watching to dry so you can pop it back on your babies bottom.  It is also a great way to ease yourself into using cloth nappies. Whether you start using them at home during the day and then when you’re feeling more confident using them out and about/ during the night, add more to your stash to go ‘full time’.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

Its great to try a mix of different brands and nappy styles but the best advice is shop to your budget. 5-10 nappies is a great place to start part time just to try things out. (Even if you decide to never go full time using 5-10 cloth nappies each week makes a difference.) Think about what is important to you in a nappy, do you want something that dries quickly, something that you won’t need to put together after washing before its ready to use, something made of all natural fibres, something to fit for a long time? Talk to other nappy users and get their opinions of what works for them and an explanation of whats what in the nappy world – there are heaps of pages online where you can connect to the nappy community, I know because I run one of them! The nappy world can be a little confusing but its also a pretty friendly place and all MCN lovers/users love to share the love of cloth!

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Using cloth doesn’t have to be all or nothing, you can use a combination of cloth and disposable. Starting with a mini stash will mean you have less outlay in the beginning and you can get a feel for whether cloth nappying is something that you can be comfortable with.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Pop over to My Green Nappy’s Awesome  Sponsors:

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