My Green Nappy Discovering Modern Cloth Nappies and Eco-Friendly Disposable Nappies

September 17, 2012

Washing Nappies: Stains on Your Australian Cloth Nappies? Tips for Removing Nappy Stains…

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Washing Nappies: Stains on your Australian Cloth Nappies?

Discover How to remove Stains from Your Cloth Nappies With Ease, and Without Causing Damage.

Tips for removing stains from cloth nappies. It’s simple. Look outside. Nature has the way with these natural nappies every time!

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

How do you remove stains from modern cloth nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Sunlight will remove most of your discolouration, but sometimes it takes a few washes.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

The sun, sun, sun and I recommend to wash every day to two days maximum.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

My absolute fave tip for stain removal is SUNLIGHT – drying in the sunshine to bleach them and then a hand scrub with sunlight soap (AKA Velvet soap) for any stains that aren’t budging in the sunshine. I havent found a stain that sunlight or sunlight soap couldn’t handle 🙂

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

The best thing for removing stains from nappies is some time in the sunshine.  For extremely stubborn stains give them a scrub with sunlight/velvet soap.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

Simple warm wash (60°C is best) on a long cycle with an extra rinse at the end with only ¼ the amount of detergent.  Air dry outside in the sunshine as the UV acts as a natural bleach and steriliser.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

Hanging out in the sunlight will remove most stains. Some bi-carb in with your wash will help too (approx. 2tbsp).

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

If you have stains on your cloth nappies DO NOT USE STAIN REMOVER. Resist the urge. Put the spray down. Stain removers break down the fabrics in the nappy.

Trying washing more than once and then leave them on the clothes line in full sun. The sun will bleach most stains out of your nappies.

If that doesn’t work, try strip washing (which involves washing your clean, dry nappies in hot water (no more than 60 degrees) without any detergent. After the first wash, wash again with a very small amount of dishwashing detergent or shampoo (no more than a teaspoon) and then wash as many times as needed to remove all the bubbles from the water coming out of your washing machine.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

Lots of sunshine will fade and naturally bleach stains from nappies. But at the end of the day, if the nappy is washed and clean the stains are only cosmetic.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

We always recommend rinsing all soiled nappies asap before dry pailing, you should never leave solids to stick to the nappy for longer than it takes to get baby changed and safely away (be it cot, playpen, someone else etc.).  You should rinse the nappy either with a nappy sprayer attached to toilet, or tissue off excess then rinse away in the laundry sink. If stains and touching solids really worry you, liners are very good for a mess free and quick way of disposing solids.  Any stains still on the nappy after a full wash cycle should then be placed in the Sun for drying.  If it’s raining, just get your nappy out to the Sun as soon as you can.

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

The best treatment for stains is prevention.  EzyPeezies uses a charcoal bamboo lining, which being a dark grey colour is a lot more forgiving than white! We recommend washing your nappies every second day as leaving dirty nappies sitting for longer makes stains more likely and harder to remove. If you have a particularly messy nappy, rinse it out as soon as possible. In this case, I usually throw it straight into the washing machine with whatever is in the nappy bucket and run it through on a rinse cycle before adding to the nappy bucket. If you do get stains on your nappies, the best solution is the sun. If possible, lie nappies out flat in the direct sunlight, inside out. For stubbon stains, nappies may need an extra day or two to help fade them.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

Try and get nappies that use stain resistant fabrics like suede cloth. Rinse off any waste as soon as you change the nappy, if its still discoloured put it in a shallow bucket of water to soak whilst awaiting the wash. If you still have stains try and get the nappies out into the sunshine for some natural bleaching!

 

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

September 1, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies. Starting With Modern Cloth Nappies: How Old Was Your Bub When You Started Using Modern Cloth Nappies?

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Australian Cloth Nappies. How Old Was Your Bub When You Started Using Modern Cloth Nappies?

Let’s Find Out When the Experts Began Using Modern Cloth Nappies on their Babies – You May Be Surprised!

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

 Starting With Modern Cloth Nappies: How Old Was Your Bub When You Started Using Modern Cloth Nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

My third baby was in cloth as soon as I got her home from hospital. Her nappies fit from birth to toilet training. Some were hand-me-downs from her brother who’d just graduated to undies, others were brand new that I made specially for her.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

My youngest baby is 14 weeks and I started using cloth as soon as he was born. I only ventured into nighttime nappies when he was 12 weeks.

However, I must confess, I didn’t use cloth with my other 2 children. I am kicking myself for that now because I could have saved almost $6,000! I simply didn’t know they existed. Bummer.

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

I started using modern cloth nappies on my oldest child from when he was a few days old.  I’m glad I did because teeny tiny nappies are very cute, but really any age, is a good time to start.  Some people prefer to wait until they are settled into motherhood and all the changes it brings before making the switch to cloth, and that can be a great idea, as you don’t want to get too swamped with new things.  There’s no reason at all that you can’t start using cloth nappies from the very beginning though, as I did.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

My oldest was about 4 months old when I started sewing modern cloth nappies.  Prior to this we’d been using terry squares and changing about 20 a day!  My youngest was in modern cloth nappies from a couple of weeks old – I confess we started off with disposables to make the transition easier (and because I misjudged how many cloth nappies we’d need & how big he’d be!)

Susan from Nifty Naps:

My first bub was 6 weeks, my second it was when I came home from hospital.

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

Melanie – We used a combination of cloth and disposables for the first 6 weeks while we adjusted to life with a newborn. Beofe giving birth, I suspected that my son was going to be a big baby (at 9lb10oz I was right!!) so had avoided buying too many small sized nappies, and mostly had OSFM or mediums. At six weeks, we made the decision not to buy any more disposables and to just make do with the modern cloth nappies we had and a stack of terry flats until he grew into the mediums. This gave us a chance to experiment with different styles, and gave his little legs a chance to fatten up a bit and really didn’t take too long at all!

Diana – We started our son in cloth gradually when he was 4 months old. Once we started to build our collection we were so enthused and quite quickly we had a full stash and he was in cloth full time. We regret not doing it earlier because it was really much easier than we had anticipated and it was lovely to not have a do a mad dash to the shops when we ran out of disposables. If we have another baby they will not be in disposables at all. I am really looking forward to doing cloth from birth now that I know how great it is.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

My bub was almost 4mo. We bought imported OSFM nappies and then I gave birth to a 6pound 6 baby who just didn’t grow that big that fast! Her tiny thighs took a long time to fill the leg holes 🙂 Since then our stash has grown and evolved, I’ve got pockets, AIOs, AI2s, prefolds and covers. I know a lot more now than I did when I took the initial leap into cloth (I saw some nappies on ebay, thought they were cute and decided I wanted to be a cloth mumma! I didn’t know anyone who used modern cloth nappies or anything about them but I do now!!!) so when I have another baby it will be in cloth from the start.

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

My bub was 4 weeks old when I started using modern cloth nappies but I used terry squares on my older kids from birth.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

First time round my sons was three months old. It took time for me to get used to having a little person around however second time round my girl went straight into cloth nappies with confidence.  If you’re new to both having a little one and using cloth don’t put too much pressure on yourself to start using cloth straight away, full time.  Give yourself time to settle in with your baby and ask around for advice from other families already using cloth (mygreennappy is a great place to start). It is perfectly fine to introduce cloth nappies into your routine gradually.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Our Comment Question is about starting with Modern Cloth Nappies:

How old was your baby when you started using MCNS?

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

August 20, 2012

New Modern Cloth Nappy User? – The Best Tips for Cleaning Cloth Nappies

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The Best Tips for Cleaning Cloth Nappies

Are You New to Australian Cloth Nappies? Discover the best tips for washing and cleaning your cloth nappies here…

This Nappy Advice Article Will Give You All You Need to Know About Washing or Cleaning your Modern Cloth Nappies with Ease and Confidence.

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

What Are The Best Tips for Cleaning Cloth Nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Use a cold pre-wash followed by a hot or warm wash, using only 1/2 the recommended amount of washing powder.  Avoid liquid detergents, pure soap flakes, fabric softeners, and anything containing brighteners and softeners.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

I love biodegradable liners! They make clean up easy as all you do is flush them down the loo.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

Leave the lid off the nappy bucket, throw the nappies (after removing any excess poop) into the bucket dry (don’t soak!) and pre-rinse them before washing. This helps to avoid urine smell build up. Use an appropriate detergent (something nappy friendly or a minimal amount of regular detergent – we use soap nuts) and hang them in the sun to dry whenever possible. Wash every day or two to avoid smells building up.

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

A nappy sprayer, while not a necessity, will make cleaning solids off your nappies so much easier.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

Wash every day or every second day to prevent build up of bacteria.  Don’t be scared to only use about ¼ the amount of detergent you would normally.  Our thumb of rule is ‘less is more’, less detergent = more absorbency.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

Use a flushable liner in your nappies, that way it catches most solid waste.  Rinse / scrape of any residual waste. Dry pail and wash separately using ¼ to ½ the recommended amount of detergent.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

Each nappy will come with its own instructions for use. You must follow those instructions to ensure you do not void your warranty.

However, these are my best tips for cleaning nappies:

  • Make sure you wash your nappies at least 4 times before using them the first time (or soak them overnight and wash once in the morning).
  • Rinse your nappies once they are soiled and store them in a dry bucket until you are ready to wash. You must rinse, or your nappies can stain and start smelling.
  • Make sure any solids are flushed down the toilet and washed off the nappy as much as you can before storing in the bucket (or you will get a really stinky bucket).
  • Make sure that you fold any Velcro tabs onto their laundry position (so they don’t get stuck on other items in the wash).
  • Wash heavily soiled nappies using a quick rinse (i.e. the last rinse cycle on your machine) before washing the nappies with other washing. This is not necessary, but is much more hygienic.
  • Wash nappies on a cold or warm wash.
  • Hang nappies in the sun to dry. The sun is a powerful anti-bacterial agent and will not only bleach the nappies but act as a sterilizer. You can tumble dry some nappies, but drying in the sun is recommended for this reason.
  • Wash nappies at least every 2 to 3 days (they can get a bit stinky if you don’t and leaving them wet for long periods can reduce the lifespan of the nappies).

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

1. Remove solid waste into the toilet and Drypail
2. Do a cold machine rinse with nappies only.
3. Do a full machine wash cycle on warm with cloth nappy friendly detergent. You may add on baby’s clothing at this stage.
4. Line dry is best to sanitise the nappy and remove stains.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

At Bumbly Bootique, we recommend always rinsing your nappies quickly before dry pailing, it takes half a minute and will absolutely reduce smell and extend the life of your fluffy investment. Not to mention, it will help with stains as well, but more importantly, what do we do with solids?

If the solids are not falling into the toilet easily we recommend the following:

  1. Adding flushable liners to your nappies
  2. Using a nappy sprayer (attached to your toilet)
  3. Or even a good old fashion washboard (after tissuing off excess), really quick and not that bad with rubber gloves 😉

 Helen from Ezy Peezies:

  1. Less is more when it comes to cloth! Make sure that you only use a small amount (about 1/4 – 1/2 the recommended amount) of a plain laundry detergent such as planet ark aware. Using too much detergent can cause build up on nappies and reduce the absorbency
  2. There is no need to soak MCN’s. In fact, don’t use any laundry additives at all. It’s very important not to add any fabric softeners as these can coat the fibres and again make the nappies less absorbent.
  3. Wash frequently – We recommend leaving dirty nappies in the nappy bucket or bag no longer than 48 hours. Leaving nappies for longer periods of time makes it harder to remove any stains and smells, and can actually damage the waterproof outer layer and elastics and reduce the lifespan of your nappies.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

  1. Get all the waste off the nappies straight away. This avoids a smelly laundry and staining.
  2. Use a good nappy friendly detergent. It will ensure your nappies last the test of time and hard wear!
  3. Hang them on a clothes horse so you can chase the sun around the yard and move them inside to continue hanging overnight!

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

August 1, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies. Need Some Advice And Help Getting Started With Modern Cloth Nappies? How To Start Part Time With A Mini Stash…

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Need Some Advice And Help Getting Started With Modern Cloth Nappies?

How To Start Using Modern Cloth Nappies Part Time With A Mini Stash…

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

Need Some Advice And Help Getting Started With Modern Cloth Nappies? How To Start Using Modern Cloth Nappies Part Time With A Mini Stash…

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Just get 3 or 5 to start with, so you can use them all in one day, wash them that night, and they’re ready again tomorrow (go for quick to dry nappies, like pockets).  You’ll get a good idea quicker if you have a full day in cloth.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

When I personally started using cloth, I only had 6 small or newborn size nappies (e.g. Tots Bots Teenyfit, Itti Bitti D’Lish (small) and GroVia newborn) and 2 extra Itti Bitti D’Lish inserts. That was enough for 8 nappy changes. However, because of the great advice I received, it was enough nappies to get me through to my baby being 12 weeks (when I expanded my nappy stash to one size nappies). Yes I had to wash a bit more than I do now, and I did use disposables at night to start with, but 6 nappies is a good number to start with.

If you are not sure what you need, we recommend that you purchase a package that has at least one of the following:

  • a pocket nappy. Try Green Kids’ Anytimes nappies.
  • a fitted nappy. Try Itti Bitti D’Lish.
  • a one size nappy. Try Cushie Tushies, Grovia Hybrid, Bitti Tutto or Ones&Twos.
  • an all in one (AIO) nappy. Try Tots Bots Easyfit or the GroVia AIO;
  • a snap in one (SIO) nappy. Try the GroVia Hybrid.

You might also want to purchase a wet bag for storing nappies when you are out and about.
We don’t recommend that you try nighttime nappies to start out with (as it could just complicate things for you and it is better to get used to using the cloth slowly at first – especially if you have been using disposables).

If you buy a trial pack of the above nappies it should give you a good selection of the different types of nappies available so you can choose what works for you.
(See our “New to Cloth – One of Everything” pack in our Nappy Packages section of our website). Our pack has one of each of the above types of nappies in it. We have selected the best selling nappies from each category to take the guess work out of it for our customers. If you buy one of the above, the pack shouldn’t cost more than $200.

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

If you’re completely new to the world of cloth nappies, then you might find that it’s easier to start with just a couple and build from there.  It sometimes takes a while to find the fit or brand of nappy that you get on best with, and I find that building a collection slowly is a great way to try out different nappies.  I find that a good place to start is by buying one or two second hand nappies, and then building your collection from there, once you know what you like.  Try using them when you’re at home to begin with, until you feel confident about full time use.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

Just start with one nappy.  Use it every couple of days, and when you’re ready, buy another one.  Check out buy & sell groups on Facebook, parenting forums, etc. because you can get some great nappies cheaply (watch out for scammers though).

Susan from Nifty Naps:

Just start with switching one with one. For example, when the bub wakes up use the first nappy of the day as a MCN and once you find out how easy it is then the second nappy and then the third etc and before you know it they will be in cloth full-time.

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

A mini stash or part time use is a great way to begin using cloth!

Start by choosing a few different styles of nappies you think you’d be interested in using, trial packs are a great option for this. Once you have compiled a small stash of 6-8 nappies and given them a couple of pre-washes, allocate one day in your week to be a Cloth Day. 6-8 nappies should be enough for the day, and then you can wash that night.

If you don’t feel like 8 nappies is enough for a whole load of washing, give the nappies a good rinse and throw them in with your other washing, avoid using fabric softeners. You might like to continue doing this for a little while until you feel comfortable using cloth full time, or you may just want to use cloth when at home.

Once you have more experience using the nappies you have, you are able to confidently add more nappies to your stash using the styles & systems you prefer.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

Its great to try a mix of different brands and nappy styles but the best advice is shop to your budget. 5-10 nappies is a great place to start part time just to try things out. (Even if you decide to never go full time using 5-10 cloth nappies each week makes a difference.) Think about what is important to you in a nappy, do you want something that dries quickly, something that you won’t need to put together after washing before its ready to use, something made of all natural fibres, something to fit for a long time? Talk to other nappy users and get their opinions of what works for them and an explanation of whats what in the nappy world – there are heaps of pages online where you can connect to the nappy community, I know because I run one of them! The nappy world can be a little confusing but its also a pretty friendly place and all MCN lovers/users love to share the love of cloth!

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

I think the best thing to do is to try out a a couple of different brands and see what suits your bub the best and works best for you and then build your stash little by little.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

Seeking advice from a nappy consultant or advocate such as ourselves can help you select a number of brands that will suit your family needs, whether it is ease of use, drying time or sticking to a budget.  A part time ‘mini stash’ will allow you to trial a few nappies styles to see which one you find yourself picking out to use before purchasing a ‘full time’ stash. Remember there is also no need to have a complete set of one style of nappy.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Our Comment Question is about getting started with MCN’s:

How did you start part time with MCN?

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

July 20, 2012

Washing Nappies HELP! Tips for Washing My *Brand New* Australian Cloth Nappies?

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Washing Nappies HELP!

Need the Best Tips for Washing Your *Brand New* Australian Cloth Nappies?

Washing your cloth nappies. This is something that Mums new to using modern nappies are concerned about. But with some basic knowledge you will be washing your cloth nappies confidently and effectively ridding them of stains, smells and baby wee! This article will give you the best advice for when you first bring those nappies home and prepare them BEFORE your baby wears their cloth nappies for the first time.

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below. Let’s see what they have to say:

What is the best thing to do when I first get some new cloth nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Pre-wash your nappies before use, to remove any residue/dyes from manufacturing.  Remember to half the detergent, and avoid liquids, brighteners, and softeners.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

Prewash only once before use to save water as there is no need to wash several times before use.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

Brand new nappies will need to be prewashed as couple of times to get the fabrics absorbency levels at its max but if ur not a fan of wasting water (and really, who is??) then try an over night soak of the inserts in cold clean water then toss the inserts and shells in the wash with your next load. Be aware which nappies are new as you might need to change them a little sooner than your broken in old faithfuls (for the first few washes).

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

Although fabrics like bamboo and hemp don’t reach peak absorbency until they have been washed around 6 – 8 times you only need to wash them once before use.  Just change them slightly more frequently until they have built up their absorbency.  This saves wasting extra water washing clean nappies.

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

Wash & dry 3 times before use to increase absorbency.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

I would always pre-wash before use at least 2-3 times. This will remove any residue from the manufacturing process, and as in the case of bamboo, maximum absorbency is reached only after a number of washes first. Wash in cold water, with an environmentally friendly detergent that doesn’t contain enzymes. Then hang out to dry on the line (hang sideways (horizontally) and peg front and back, ensuring elastics are not stretched).

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

When you get your new nappies, you have to fight the urge to put them straight on your bub (yes, I know it is hard, but you have to). Before you use your nappies, you must wash them a minimum of 4 times. Most nappies will come with instructions from the supplier and you must follow those instructions if you do not want to void your warranty. Some suppliers suggest that you need to dry the nappies between washes and some don’t. Washing a minimum of 4 times will make the nappies absorbent. Without doing it, your nappies will leak. You can’t skip this step! As a short cut, you could try soaking the nappies overnight and then washing them once in the morning. If they leak after that, you can wash them a few more times.

Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

Simply machine wash once and use when dry, bearing in mind to change bub sooner initially, since it takes a few washes for the nappy to reach full absorbency.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

Washing new nappies several times will improve the absorbency of bamboo and it is therefore recommended by us to put your nappies through the 2-3 wash cycles prior to use. Only use laundry detergent (and nothing else) with the first cycle, then follow with another couple of cycles with no detergent to help loosen the bamboo fibres more. Drying between washes is not required.
Nappies with no bamboo or hemp would need only to be washed once prior to use.

Helen from Ezy Peezies:

Before using your new MCN’s we recommend that you pop all the nappies and inserts into the washing machine and run through a full wash cycle without any detergent. Once the cycle has finished, run it through on a second plain cold cycle. There is no need to dry the nappies in between. This is to help remove any residues that may remain from the manufacturing process, as well as increasing the absorbency of the bamboo fabrics. Bamboo takes about 8 washes to reach its full absorbency. You can dry, and use your nappies after the two initial plain washes, but just be aware your nappies won’t be at their full absorbency for the first couple of uses and you may want to change a little more frequently or add an additional booster to prevent any leaks.

Jenny from Baby Bare:

 You have a few choices with new nappies. You could do a full strip wash to remove any manufacturing chemicals and other build up in your fabric. Otherwise wash them once with soap, then do a few rinse cycles or short wash cycles without soap. They will get more absorbant over time but this will be sufficient for the first use. Be mindful though your nappies may not last as long till after a few wears!

 

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways? Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

July 1, 2012

Australian Cloth Nappies. How Long Do You Expect a Modern Cloth Nappy To Last?

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Australian Cloth Nappies. How Long Do You Expect a Modern Cloth Nappy To Last?

What is the Overall lifespan of a Modern Cloth Nappy anyway?

For this question we are looking at the overall lifespan of the cloth nappy, rather than how long you can leave it on your baby before they need to have a nappy change. If you have more than one baby in nappies, or know you plan to have more, the lifespan of a nappy means you can massively increase your savings when compared to using disposable nappies.

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

How Long Do You Expect a Modern Cloth Nappy To Last? What is the Overall lifespan of a Modern Cloth Nappy anyway?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

Some of mine have been used or washed every day for 4 years, and are still going strong, still looking good. I generally expect them to start looking a little faded or ragged after a year or so, but still be fully functional. In fact, I make mine with a 12 month guarantee, (18 months on elastic) and do free repairs/resizings at anytime. I want you to be happy with your nappies for as long as you need them, and then be able to pass them on.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

I would expect a good quality Modern Cloth Nappy to last two – three babies (using them full time for 2 ½ years for each baby). However, cloth nappies are like any items of baby clothing: if they are not looked after they wont last as long as items that are looked after and after long periods of wear they will become shabby looking.

Your MCNs will last longer the better you treat them. For example, if you wash in warm water or soak them, this could break down the fabrics in some nappies and shorten the life of your MCNs. Also, drying your nappies in the dryer or hanging the nappies on the clothes line so that the elastic stretches can also reduce the life of your MCNs. You should also be careful about how you store nappies between babies (because extended storage can affect the elasticity of some nappies).

Also, having more nappies in your stash will extend the life of your Modern Cloth Nappies (as they are washed less frequently).

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

Modern cloth nappies have a surprisingly long lifespan.  I have nappies in my collection that have been on at least four children and are well over 7 years old, and yet they are still going strong.  As long as you look after them, you should get a great deal of wear out of them.  You might find that some nappies need a little maintenance, such as the elastic replacing after a few years, but it’s a relatively simple job, and even those who are not a dab hand with the sewing machine should be able to find a friend or relative who can.

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

If you follow the manufacturer’s instructions, a Modern Cloth Nappy should last at least a couple of years.  Sized nappies (at least smalls & mediums) should last for ages (2-3 children) since babies are in them for so short a time.  Larges & AIO nappies I imagine have a shorter life.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

I think if you were to have the required amount of good quality MCNS in your ‘stash’ to cloth one child full-time without ever running out when washing every 2 days and they are taken cared of then they should last 3 children in a row easily.

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

This is a question we are asked often, with the answer being somewhat complex. The same nappy may last for many years, being used on several children with some people, while only just lasting out one child with others! The length of time a nappy will last depends on many factors, such as how many nappies you have in your stash, how they are washed/dried, are they a OSFM which will be in constant use for 2.5 years or a sized nappy that won’t be used as long, what sort of fabric is the nappy made of, and so on.

Increasing your nappy stash to have more nappies than you actually ‘need’ will help to increase the length of time they last for, especially if you have a lot of OSFM or multi size nappies. Using a tumble dryer and washing with hot water can reduce the life span off nappies, as can soaking in chemicals. Hanging nappies so that the leg elastic isn’t strained and line drying in the sun will help with this.

Some babies may have super strong or ‘toxic’ wee, in which case its best to rinse each nappy out before dry pailing to help prevent the wee from eating into the fabric. When choosing fabrics, while Bamboo is super absorbent, it isn’t a very strong fabric on its own. It is often blended with cotton to give it more strength. Hemp and Cotton are extremely hard wearing fabrics.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

I think when it comes to cloth nappies you get what you paid for. I have plenty of CCs (china cheapies, imported nappies) and then I have WAHM made nappies and brand name nappies. With proper care I would expect the cheaper nappies to last a child from birth to toilet training or longer. More expensive nappies should be good to use for multiple children (and most elastics can be replaced if you’ve got some sewing skills or you can ask a WAHM to do them for you so they can keep going long beyond the life span of their elastic!)

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

That depends a lot on the Modern Cloth Nappy you buy and how you care for them.  Cheap imports will usually see you through one baby if you look after them whereas a good WAHM made one will last through 2 or 3 kids.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

It does depend on the quality of the individual brand purchased. Most cloth nappies will last the use from birth to potty training for two siblings if not more if they are well looked after.  This includes not using a dryer, hanging as to not stretch the elastic etc. You may be able to extend the life of some nappies by replacing the elastic and Velcro. To get the most out of your cloth nappies follow the manufactures guidelines and choose snaps over Velcro.  

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Our Comment Question is about Cloth Nappies and their longevity:

Which brands have lasted the longest and in best condition for you? (and in what size of nappy rotation!)

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

June 20, 2012

Washing Modern Cloth Nappies: 3 Important Points when washing Australian Cloth Nappies…

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Washing Modern Cloth Nappies:

3 Important Points To Remember When Washing Australian Cloth Nappies…

How do you wash cloth nappies so that they will last through more than one baby’s needs? So they will be absorbent, clean and fresh smelling?

Many Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below. Let’s see what they have to say:

What are 3 Important Points to Remember When Washing Cloth Nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

  1. Cold pre-wash (or rinse).  It removes nasties.
  2. Hot or warm wash gets best results.
  3. 1/2 the amount of washing powder. Too much will cause build up.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

No bleach, no soaking and the Sun is your friend 🙂

Jodi from MCN Lovers R US:

  1.  When it comes to detergents LESS IS MORE!!!
  2. Sunshine is your absolute best friend for stain removal.
  3. Pre-rinse and get all the wee out before you wash your nappies – otherwise your washing them in wee filled water and they will often still smell (especially when its teething time!).

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

  1. Use detergent without enzymes and about half as much as you usually would,
  2. Wash PUL in less than 60 degree water,
  3. Run your nappies through a rinse cycle before washing for extra freshness

Kate from Bouncing Bubs:

  1. Dry pail – no soaking, no scrubbing, simply dispose of solids in toilet and place nappy in bucket.
  2. Prerinse – In washing machine with cold water & no detergent. This will help remove urine and bacteria from the nappy.
  3. Wash – Warm wash (60°C is best) on a long cycle with an extra rinse at the end. This will remove all the bacteria and urine from the nappies. Make sure to only use about ¼ the amount of detergent you would normally. Our thumb of rule is ‘less is more’, less detergent = more absorbency.

Sarah from Billy and the Bow Wow:

  1. Do not soak, it’s not necessary and will shorten the life of your nappies
  2. Wash at least every 2 days using an environmentally friendly detergent and use a quarter to half as much as suggested, this will help prevent detergent build up, which causes your nappies to smell and be less absorbent.
  3. Avoid detergents with enzymes as this can react with sensitive skin and cause nappy rash.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

  1. Never use fabric softener, stain removers, nappisan or any other bleach products. These chemicals will break down the natural fabrics of the nappy.
  2. Don’t tumble dry your nappies on full heat. The heat can also break down the fibres.
  3. If you can, hang clean nappies on the clothes line to dry in full sun. It is the best way to dry your nappies as the sun acts as an antibacterial agent.

 Rebecca from Bean Sprout Bubba:

  1. Store soiled nappies in a dry pail until wash day. If bub is teething or prone to acidic wees, rinse inserts under a tap before drypailing.
  2. To preserve elastics, turn down the spin cycle on your washing machine to a maximum of 800-1000rpm, and do not stretch the elastic when the nappy is still warm if you opt to use a dryer.
  3. Follow the manufacturers instructions to maintain your nappies in the best condition for longer.

Therese from Bumbly Bootique:

  1. Use only a quarter to a third scoop of baby friendly laundry detergent for standard washes and nothing else
  2. Include an extra prewash or rinse cycle
  3. Do not have your water too hot, try to keep it max 60 degrees, 40’s even better

Helen from Ezy Peezies:

  1.  Less is more when it comes to cloth! Make sure that you only use a small amount (about 1/4 – 1/2 the recommended amount) of a plain laundry detergent such as planet ark aware. Using too much detergent can cause build up on nappies and reduce the absorbency
  2. There is no need to soak MCN’s. In fact, don’t use any laundry additives at all. It’s very important not to add any fabric softeners as these can coat the fibres and again make the nappies less absorbent.
  3. Wash frequently – We recommend leaving dirty nappies in the nappy bucket or bag no longer than 48 hours. Leaving nappies for longer periods of time makes it harder to remove any stains and smells, and can actually damage the waterproof outer layer and elastics and reduce the lifespan of your nappies.

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Charndra P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways? Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

June 1, 2012

I’m Thinking About Converting To The Modern Cloth Nappy… Why Should I Make The Switch To Cloth Nappies?

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I’m Thinking About Converting To The Modern Cloth Nappy…

Why Should I Make The Switch To Cloth Nappies?

 Australian cloth nappies are very popular, and you’ll find the best cloth nappies make the switch to modern cloth nappies easy. But WHY convert to using modern cloth nappies? There are several reasons mothers make the switch, the number one reason being money. You can save money by using modern cloth nappies. For others it is environmental reasons, for still more it is for the style! Their baby looks cool in their cloth nappies and you know they feel so soft on their bottom.

Our Nappy Experts are invited to contribute to these cooperative questions so that you get a range of informative and experienced responses about the topic. Enjoy and discover something new, and share with us in the comment box below.

Let’s see what they have to say:

I’m Thinking About Converting To The Modern Cloth Nappy, Why Should I Make The Switch To Cloth Nappies?

Lara from Extremely Nappies (closed):

You’ll save tons of money! You’ll never have a stinky bin again. You’ll avoid the nasty rashes and worse from the chemicals and bleaches in disposables. You’ll stop polluting the earth with a mountain of stinking, indestructible nappies. You can boycott the multinationals. You won’t spend any more money on rubbish. You’ll reduce the carbon footprint of yourself and your children.

I’m always happy to answer your questions personally, even if you use a different brand.

Angie from Piggy Tails Nappies:

The question you should be asking yourself is why not switch? There is much commentary out there on why you should switch including environmental benefits (yes – you get to do your bit to save the earth) and reducing the incidences of nappy rash (because of the natural fibers in each nappy), but by far the most important reason is the financial savings you will enjoy if you make the switch.

If you think about how many disposable nappies you go through in a day and multiply that out by the number of years that your baby will be in nappies (roughly 2 1/2 years on average) the cost of financing a disposable nappy regime is sickening to say the least. You could be looking at up to $3,000 (not to mention the cost if you have 2 or more babies in nappies). Your initial outlay for a full time pack of cloth nappies is approximately $500 – $700 (for a good quality cloth nappy package) but that initial outlay is far less than the $3,000 you are likely to spend in buying disposable nappies. Multiply the savings when you use your nappies on a second or third baby or when you sell your nappies second hand (which there is a great market for by the way) or when you get someone else to buy the nappies for you (e.g. as a baby shower gift).

In addition to financial savings, your baby will look absolutely adorable in its Modern Cloth Nappy (which come in all sorts of cute patterns, colours and designs)!

Kelly from Nappy Needz:

There are huge benefits to using cloth over disposable nappies. You can save over $1000 on your first child alone, which is a huge incentive, without even taking into account the environmental or health benefits. Fewer chemicals against your babies skin has to be a good thing, and less rubbish to put out each week is always a bonus!

Melissa from Little Para Pants:

You’ll save so much money when you use Modern Cloth Nappies instead of disposables.  One cloth nappy, at around $30, can pay for itself almost three times in the first year alone.

Susan from Nifty Naps:

 I think we all use cloth nappies for a number of reasons but personally for me it was solely to do with the environment and what was best for my babies in terms of sustainable living. I always wanted to use cloth and when I was pregnant with my first I thought I was going to use terry flats and covers until I found the magical world of modern cloth nappies and now not only are they great for the environment they look good too!

Melanie & Diana from Bodeo:

Modern Cloth Nappies are so easy to use, free of chemicals and will save your family money! Many babies will spend 2.5+ years in nappies, if using disposables that is a LOT of nappies being thrown away. Switching to cloth, even part time, will mean your baby is wearing something that is comfortable, breathable and can be used over and over without adding to landfill. Starting with one ‘cloth’ day per week is a great way to begin, and allows you to try out a few different styles of nappies before committing to a whole stash.

Jodi from MCN Lovers R Us:

I think the real question is ‘Why should you not make the switch to cloth nappies???’ What is gained by using disposables?
People often tell me they don’t have the time to be a cloth mumma but I’m no superhousewife, (I’m typing this surrounded by the toys that I just haven’t bothered to tidy up tonight – its Offspring night so don’t judge me!!!) but I do do laundry, we wear clean clothes everyday! And an extra load of washing isn’t something I’ve ever noticed. In fact, MCNs are so easy to care for that mine just get thrown in with the rest of the wash! I do laundry 3 or 4 days a week, I’m pretty sure non cloth families do a similar amount of laundry 🙂

The environment is another factor. Now, I’m certainly not a hippy by any means but I do think its important to care for the planet too. Its the only one we have after all. Did you know the first disposable ever made is sitting in landfill tonight, just sitting there, taken up space, not breaking down, filled with decades old excrement – ewwww 😉 And contrary to that very popular argument, the water used to wash an MCN doesn’t have near the same environmental impact as a disposable does. So when you use MCNs you get to pat yourself on the back each night for being so good to the environment 😉

And then there’s the money side. Now, I’ll admit, MCNs can get addictive and if you wanted to you could spend a whole heap of money on ‘pretties’ BUT you still would save money over using disposable nappies. Cloth nappies come in all shapes and sizes to suit all budgets and can be reused from child to child and passed on, donated or sold when your family is finished with them so more babies can use them (and more disposables are saved from landfill). Even using just 1 cloth nappy a day saves you buying 365 disposables, think of what that extra money could do for your household (or you could just put it in the Mumma bank as payment for that tiny bit of extra washing you will do – and believe me, its a tiny amount 😉

Erin from Rascal Rumps:

MCNs are easy to use, save heaps of money (that’s the biggie) and are great for the environment, after all it’s our babies who will be growing up on this planet.

Nat and Amy from Little Diamond Bums (closed):

There are four underlying reasons why parents decide to switch to cloth. The importance of each of these differ from family to family. The first and most widely promoted are the environmental benefits. There are many facts, figures and statistics that demonstrate the reduction in landfill and other environmental benefits that using cloth nappies can provide. The second undeniably is the cost benefits of using both cloth nappies and cloth wipes. Third is the health benefits, cloth gives you more control on what you are putting against your babies skin and finally they are just so darn cute but come with a warning… they can be addictive!

– Our Nappy Experts –

Discover Expert Advice About The Modern Cloth Nappy – Information About Modern Cloth Nappies – Advice About Frequently Asked Cloth ‘Newbie’ Questions – Lots of Tips and Tricks to Help You With Your Reusable Nappies – Learn From the Experts in Cloth Nappies –

Discover More from Our Nappy Experts…

Our Comment Question is about converting to modern cloth nappies:

If you’ve converted to modern cloth nappies, tell us your number one reason why? Saving Money? Environmental? Style?

Charndra


P.S. Are you registered to play in our regular nappy giveaways?
Be sure to sign up to have your chance to WIN a free modern cloth nappy for your baby!

Thank you to My Green Nappy’s Sponsoring Partners:

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